Local enzymatic treatment of atherosclerotic plaques

T. Kerényi, V. Merkel, Z. Szabolcs, P. Pusztai, G. Nádasy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fat rich and fibromuscular lesions experimentally induced in animals as well as human atherosclerotic plaques were locally digested enzymatically with the help of a newly developed double balloon catheter. The technique was most successful if applied to fat rich intimal proliferations of hypercholesterolemic rabbits, while the fibromuscular plaques of dog femoral arteries and of human common carotid arteries were less sensitive to the treatment. Osmotic or denaturing pretreatments increased the efficiency of the different proteolytic enzymes. Thrombotic complications and leukocytic infiltration developed in dogs surviving the enzymatic digestion by 2 days. A perfect enzymatic dissolution of the fibromuscular plaques was not achieved but the enzymatic digestion appeared to offer the organism a chance to complete the dissolution by its own means. The passive mechanical properties of the treated human carotid arteries changed favorably. The technique requires skill and a competent background in vascular surgery. Nonetheless the local enzymatic treatment might serve either as an adjunct to angioplasty or as an alternative treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-338
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental and Molecular Pathology
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1988

Fingerprint

Atherosclerotic Plaques
Dissolution
Fats
Catheters
Digestion
Balloons
Infiltration
Dogs
Tunica Intima
Surgery
Animals
Peptide Hydrolases
Common Carotid Artery
Femoral Artery
Angioplasty
Carotid Arteries
Mechanical properties
Blood Vessels
Therapeutics
Rabbits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Local enzymatic treatment of atherosclerotic plaques. / Kerényi, T.; Merkel, V.; Szabolcs, Z.; Pusztai, P.; Nádasy, G.

In: Experimental and Molecular Pathology, Vol. 49, No. 3, 1988, p. 330-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kerényi, T. ; Merkel, V. ; Szabolcs, Z. ; Pusztai, P. ; Nádasy, G. / Local enzymatic treatment of atherosclerotic plaques. In: Experimental and Molecular Pathology. 1988 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 330-338.
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