Local cerebral blood flow during and after bilateral carotid artery occlusion in unanesthetized gerbils

G. Nádasy, Joel H. Greenberg, Martin Reivich, Arisztid G B Kovach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using [14C]iodoantipyrine autoradiography, we measured regional cerebral blood flow in unanesthetized gerbils subjected to 2 (n=5) or 30 (n=6) minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion or 5 (n=6), 30 (n=6), or 120 (n=5) minutes of reflow after 30 minutes of occlusion. Blood pressure, respiratory rate, and blood gases were recorded, and these and other gerbils were evaluated with periodic neurologic examinations. Blood flow to structures above the level of the diencephalon ceased almost totally during occlusion. The lateral thalamus, the rostral three quarters of the hypothalamus, and the superior colliculi were also markedly ischemic Blood flow to the brainstem and cerebellum was only slightly affected. After release of the occlusion, blood flow was restored in some of the affected areas but to levels somewhat below that in eight sham-operated gerbils. In several areas, principally column-shaped areas in the cortex as well as patchy areas in other structures, blood flow did not recover. This inhomoge-neous blood flow distribution lasted at least 30 minutes after release of the occlusion. Thereafter, the in homogeneity slowly disappeared in such a manner that blood flow to originally well reperfused areas appeared to decrease while that to poorly reperfused areas increased. During reflow, blood flow in the brainstem and cerebellum slowly and continuously decreased. We show that there is an early no-reflow phenomenon that is inhomogeneous and appears to be of vascular origin and lasts approximately 30 minutes after release of the occlusion. Parallel with this restoration of blood flow in ischemic areas is a general decrease in blood flow to unaffected areas that develops within 30-120 minutes after release of the occlusion. This late, homogeneous impaired perfusion is possibly a result of developing generalized brain edema.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)901-907
Number of pages7
JournalStroke
Volume21
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Gerbillinae
Carotid Arteries
Cerebellum
Brain Stem
No-Reflow Phenomenon
Diencephalon
Superior Colliculi
Brain Edema
Regional Blood Flow
Neurologic Examination
Respiratory Rate
Autoradiography
Thalamus
Hypothalamus
Blood Vessels

Keywords

  • Cerebral blood flow
  • Cerebral ischemia
  • Gerbils

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Nádasy, G., Greenberg, J. H., Reivich, M., & Kovach, A. G. B. (1990). Local cerebral blood flow during and after bilateral carotid artery occlusion in unanesthetized gerbils. Stroke, 21(6), 901-907.

Local cerebral blood flow during and after bilateral carotid artery occlusion in unanesthetized gerbils. / Nádasy, G.; Greenberg, Joel H.; Reivich, Martin; Kovach, Arisztid G B.

In: Stroke, Vol. 21, No. 6, 1990, p. 901-907.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nádasy, G, Greenberg, JH, Reivich, M & Kovach, AGB 1990, 'Local cerebral blood flow during and after bilateral carotid artery occlusion in unanesthetized gerbils', Stroke, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 901-907.
Nádasy, G. ; Greenberg, Joel H. ; Reivich, Martin ; Kovach, Arisztid G B. / Local cerebral blood flow during and after bilateral carotid artery occlusion in unanesthetized gerbils. In: Stroke. 1990 ; Vol. 21, No. 6. pp. 901-907.
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