Linear measurements of the neurocranium are better indicators of population differences than those of the facial skeleton

Comparative study of 1,961 skulls

Gábor Holló, László Szathmáry, Antónia Marcsik, Z. Barta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study is to individualize potential differences between two cranial regions used to differentiate human populations. We compared the neurocranium and the facial skeleton using skulls from the Great Hungarian Plain. The skulls date to the 1st11th centuries, a long space of time that encompasses seven archaeological periods. We analyzed six neurocranial and seven facial measurements. The reduction of the number of variables was carried out using principal components analysis. Linear mixed-effects models were fitted to the principal components of each archaeological period, and then the models were compared using multiple pairwise tests. The neurocranium showed significant differences in seven cases between nonsubsequent periods and in one case, between two subsequent populations. For the facial skeleton, no significant results were found. Our results, which are also compared to previous craniofacial heritability estimates, suggest that the neurocranium is a more conservative region and that population differences can be pointed out better in the neurocranium than in the facial skeleton.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-46
Number of pages18
JournalHuman Biology
Volume82
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

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skull
Skull
Skeleton
skeleton
comparative study
Population
heritability
Principal Component Analysis
human population
principal component analysis
indicator
testing

Keywords

  • Craniometrics
  • Facial skeleton
  • Great Hungarian plain
  • Hallstatt crania
  • Linear mixed-effects model
  • Neurocranium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Linear measurements of the neurocranium are better indicators of population differences than those of the facial skeleton : Comparative study of 1,961 skulls. / Holló, Gábor; Szathmáry, László; Marcsik, Antónia; Barta, Z.

In: Human Biology, Vol. 82, No. 1, 02.2010, p. 29-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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