Lifetime hypertension as a predictor of brain structure in older adults: Cohort study with a 28-year follow-up

Charlotte L. Allan, Enikõ Zsoldos, Nicola Filippini, Claire E. Sexton, Anya Topiwala, Vyara Valkanova, Archana Singh-Manoux, A. Tabák, Martin J. Shipley, Clare Mackay, Klaus P. Ebmeier, Mika Kivimäki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hypertension is associated with an increased risk of dementia and depression with uncertain longitudinal associations with brain structure. Aims: To examine lifetime blood pressure as a predictor of brain structure in old age. Method: A total of 190 participants (mean age 69.3 years) from the Whitehall II study were screened for hypertension six times (1985-2013). In 2012-2013, participants had a 3T-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan. Data from the MRI were analysed using automated and visual measures of global atrophy, hippocampal atrophy and white matter hyperintensities. Results: Longitudinally, higher mean arterial pressure predicted increased automated white matter hyperintensities (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)308-315
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume206
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Cohort Studies
Hypertension
Atrophy
Brain
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Dementia
Arterial Pressure
Depression
Blood Pressure
White Matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Allan, C. L., Zsoldos, E., Filippini, N., Sexton, C. E., Topiwala, A., Valkanova, V., ... Kivimäki, M. (2015). Lifetime hypertension as a predictor of brain structure in older adults: Cohort study with a 28-year follow-up. British Journal of Psychiatry, 206(4), 308-315. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.114.153536

Lifetime hypertension as a predictor of brain structure in older adults : Cohort study with a 28-year follow-up. / Allan, Charlotte L.; Zsoldos, Enikõ; Filippini, Nicola; Sexton, Claire E.; Topiwala, Anya; Valkanova, Vyara; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Tabák, A.; Shipley, Martin J.; Mackay, Clare; Ebmeier, Klaus P.; Kivimäki, Mika.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 206, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 308-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allan, CL, Zsoldos, E, Filippini, N, Sexton, CE, Topiwala, A, Valkanova, V, Singh-Manoux, A, Tabák, A, Shipley, MJ, Mackay, C, Ebmeier, KP & Kivimäki, M 2015, 'Lifetime hypertension as a predictor of brain structure in older adults: Cohort study with a 28-year follow-up', British Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 206, no. 4, pp. 308-315. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.114.153536
Allan, Charlotte L. ; Zsoldos, Enikõ ; Filippini, Nicola ; Sexton, Claire E. ; Topiwala, Anya ; Valkanova, Vyara ; Singh-Manoux, Archana ; Tabák, A. ; Shipley, Martin J. ; Mackay, Clare ; Ebmeier, Klaus P. ; Kivimäki, Mika. / Lifetime hypertension as a predictor of brain structure in older adults : Cohort study with a 28-year follow-up. In: British Journal of Psychiatry. 2015 ; Vol. 206, No. 4. pp. 308-315.
@article{125336924694429facbb1ab82f08468e,
title = "Lifetime hypertension as a predictor of brain structure in older adults: Cohort study with a 28-year follow-up",
abstract = "Background: Hypertension is associated with an increased risk of dementia and depression with uncertain longitudinal associations with brain structure. Aims: To examine lifetime blood pressure as a predictor of brain structure in old age. Method: A total of 190 participants (mean age 69.3 years) from the Whitehall II study were screened for hypertension six times (1985-2013). In 2012-2013, participants had a 3T-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan. Data from the MRI were analysed using automated and visual measures of global atrophy, hippocampal atrophy and white matter hyperintensities. Results: Longitudinally, higher mean arterial pressure predicted increased automated white matter hyperintensities (P",
author = "Allan, {Charlotte L.} and Enik{\~o} Zsoldos and Nicola Filippini and Sexton, {Claire E.} and Anya Topiwala and Vyara Valkanova and Archana Singh-Manoux and A. Tab{\'a}k and Shipley, {Martin J.} and Clare Mackay and Ebmeier, {Klaus P.} and Mika Kivim{\"a}ki",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1192/bjp.bp.114.153536",
language = "English",
volume = "206",
pages = "308--315",
journal = "British Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0007-1250",
publisher = "Royal College of Psychiatrists",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lifetime hypertension as a predictor of brain structure in older adults

T2 - Cohort study with a 28-year follow-up

AU - Allan, Charlotte L.

AU - Zsoldos, Enikõ

AU - Filippini, Nicola

AU - Sexton, Claire E.

AU - Topiwala, Anya

AU - Valkanova, Vyara

AU - Singh-Manoux, Archana

AU - Tabák, A.

AU - Shipley, Martin J.

AU - Mackay, Clare

AU - Ebmeier, Klaus P.

AU - Kivimäki, Mika

PY - 2015/4/1

Y1 - 2015/4/1

N2 - Background: Hypertension is associated with an increased risk of dementia and depression with uncertain longitudinal associations with brain structure. Aims: To examine lifetime blood pressure as a predictor of brain structure in old age. Method: A total of 190 participants (mean age 69.3 years) from the Whitehall II study were screened for hypertension six times (1985-2013). In 2012-2013, participants had a 3T-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan. Data from the MRI were analysed using automated and visual measures of global atrophy, hippocampal atrophy and white matter hyperintensities. Results: Longitudinally, higher mean arterial pressure predicted increased automated white matter hyperintensities (P

AB - Background: Hypertension is associated with an increased risk of dementia and depression with uncertain longitudinal associations with brain structure. Aims: To examine lifetime blood pressure as a predictor of brain structure in old age. Method: A total of 190 participants (mean age 69.3 years) from the Whitehall II study were screened for hypertension six times (1985-2013). In 2012-2013, participants had a 3T-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan. Data from the MRI were analysed using automated and visual measures of global atrophy, hippocampal atrophy and white matter hyperintensities. Results: Longitudinally, higher mean arterial pressure predicted increased automated white matter hyperintensities (P

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84928007490&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84928007490&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1192/bjp.bp.114.153536

DO - 10.1192/bjp.bp.114.153536

M3 - Article

C2 - 25497301

AN - SCOPUS:84928007490

VL - 206

SP - 308

EP - 315

JO - British Journal of Psychiatry

JF - British Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0007-1250

IS - 4

ER -