Leptin and aging: Review and questions with particular emphasis on its role in the central regulation of energy balance

Márta Balaskó, Szilvia Soós, Miklós Székely, Erika Pétervári

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Leptin is produced mainly in the white adipose tissue and emerged as one of the key catabolic regulators of food intake and energy expenditure. During the course of aging characteristic alterations in body weight and body composition in humans and mammals, i.e. middle-aged obesity and aging anorexia and cachexia, suggest age-related regulatory changes in energy balance in the background. Aging has been associated with increased fat mass, central and peripheral leptin resistance as indicated by its failure to reduce food intake, to increase metabolic rate and thereby to induce weight loss. Leptin resistance is a common feature of aging and obesity (even in the young). The question arises whether aging or fat accumulation plays the primary role in the development of this resistance. The review focuses mainly on mechanisms and development of central leptin resistance. Age-related decline primarily affects the hypermetabolic component of central catabolic leptin actions, while the anorexigenic component is even growing stronger in the late phase of aging. Obesity enhances resistance to leptin at any age, particularly in old rats, calorie-restriction, on the other hand, increases responsiveness to leptin, especially in the oldest age-group. Thus, without obesity, leptin sensitivity appears not to decrease but to increase by old age. Interactions with other substances (e.g. insulin, cholecystokinin, endogenous cannabinoids) and life-style factors (e.g. exercise) in these age-related changes need to be investigated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-255
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of chemical neuroanatomy
Volume61
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2014

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Calorie-restriction
  • Energy balance
  • Leptin
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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