Lateralization of observational fear learning at the cortical but not thalamic level in mice

Sangwoo Kim, Ferenc Mátyás, Sukchan Lee, L. Acsády, Hee Sup Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Major cognitive and emotional faculties are dominantly lateralized in the human cerebral cortex. The mechanism of this lateralization has remained elusive owing to the inaccessibility of human brains to many experimental manipulations. In this study we demonstrate the hemispheric lateralization of observational fear learning in mice. Using unilateral inactivation as well as electrical stimulation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), we show that observational fear learning is controlled by the right but not the left ACC. In contrast to the cortex, inactivation of either left or right thalamic nuclei, both of which are in reciprocal connection to ACC, induced similar impairment of this behavior. The data suggest that lateralization of negative emotions is an evolutionarily conserved trait and mainly involves cortical operations. Lateralization of the observational fear learning behavior in a rodent model will allow detailed analysis of cortical asymmetry in cognitive functions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15497-15501
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume109
Issue number38
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 18 2012

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Gyrus Cinguli
Fear
Learning
Thalamic Nuclei
Cerebral Cortex
Cognition
Electric Stimulation
Rodentia
Emotions
Brain

Keywords

  • Anterograde and retrograde tracing
  • Social fear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Lateralization of observational fear learning at the cortical but not thalamic level in mice. / Kim, Sangwoo; Mátyás, Ferenc; Lee, Sukchan; Acsády, L.; Shin, Hee Sup.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 109, No. 38, 18.09.2012, p. 15497-15501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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