Latent homology and convergent regulatory evolution underlies the repeated emergence of yeasts

László G. Nagy, Robin A. Ohm, G. Kovács, Dimitrios Floudas, Robert Riley, A. Gácser, M. Sipiczki, John M. Davis, Sharon L. Doty, G. Sybren De Hoog, B. Franz Lang, Joseph W. Spatafora, Francis M. Martin, Igor V. Grigoriev, David S. Hibbett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Convergent evolution is common throughout the tree of life, but the molecular mechanisms causing similar phenotypes to appear repeatedly are obscure. Yeasts have arisen in multiple fungal clades, but the genetic causes and consequences of their evolutionary origins are unknown. Here we show that the potential to develop yeast forms arose early in fungal evolution and became dominant independently in multiple clades, most likely via parallel diversification of Zn-cluster transcription factors, a fungal-specific family involved in regulating yeast-filamentous switches. Our results imply that convergent evolution can happen by the repeated deployment of a conserved genetic toolkit for the same function in distinct clades via regulatory evolution. We suggest that this mechanism might be a common source of evolutionary convergence even at large time scales.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4471
JournalNature Communications
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 18 2014

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yeast
homology
Yeast
Yeasts
phenotype
Transcription Factors
Switches
Phenotype
switches
causes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Latent homology and convergent regulatory evolution underlies the repeated emergence of yeasts. / Nagy, László G.; Ohm, Robin A.; Kovács, G.; Floudas, Dimitrios; Riley, Robert; Gácser, A.; Sipiczki, M.; Davis, John M.; Doty, Sharon L.; De Hoog, G. Sybren; Lang, B. Franz; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Martin, Francis M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 5, 4471, 18.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nagy, LG, Ohm, RA, Kovács, G, Floudas, D, Riley, R, Gácser, A, Sipiczki, M, Davis, JM, Doty, SL, De Hoog, GS, Lang, BF, Spatafora, JW, Martin, FM, Grigoriev, IV & Hibbett, DS 2014, 'Latent homology and convergent regulatory evolution underlies the repeated emergence of yeasts', Nature Communications, vol. 5, 4471. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms5471
Nagy, László G. ; Ohm, Robin A. ; Kovács, G. ; Floudas, Dimitrios ; Riley, Robert ; Gácser, A. ; Sipiczki, M. ; Davis, John M. ; Doty, Sharon L. ; De Hoog, G. Sybren ; Lang, B. Franz ; Spatafora, Joseph W. ; Martin, Francis M. ; Grigoriev, Igor V. ; Hibbett, David S. / Latent homology and convergent regulatory evolution underlies the repeated emergence of yeasts. In: Nature Communications. 2014 ; Vol. 5.
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