Laser-matter interactions: Nanostructures, fabrication and characterization

L. Nánai, Zsolt I. Benkȍ, Renat R. Letfullin, Thomas F. George

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The study of phenomena induced by laser radiation in both continuous (CW) and pulsed modes on solid surfaces is a widely-explored subject of modern solid-state physics and chemistry. Since the advent of the first laser in the 1960s, a huge number of scientific papers have been devoted to the investigation of different kinds of laser-matter processes, such as laser-induced damage, plasma formation, phase transitions, micro- and macroprocessing, laser-induced chemical reactions at gas- solid and liquid-solid, etc. These efforts have resulted in new laser applications in industry, e.g. cutting, welding and hardening. The laser has become a useful tool for initiating unique chemical reactions to produce advanced materials, like ultrahard ones for example. A number of technological applications, such as laser-induced deposition of metals on porous materials and semiconductor surfaces, already exist in the high-tech industry of micro- and nanoelectronics. Production of catalyzers with tailored properties of different nanostructures and components is prevalent in the chemical industry. Many years of theoretical and experimental investigations in this area have resulted in a host of valuable physical and chemical discoveries leading to the creation of new sciences, e.g., femtochemistry. The technical development of lasers has yielded a new class of instruments - fs lasers - which are able to produce extra high (TW/cm2) intensities within the focal spot on targets. Ultrashort lasers are becoming the source of different nonlinear events with high impact on contemporary science, such as on the study of events happening in states far from equilibrium and in nonlinear circumstances. In this chapter, we discuss fs laser-matter interactions, including the production and properties of different nanostructures.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComputational Studies of New Materials II: From Ultrafast Processes and Nanostructures to Optoelectronics, Energy Storage and Nanomedicine
PublisherWorld Scientific Publishing Co.
Pages1-36
Number of pages36
ISBN (Electronic)9789814287197
ISBN (Print)9814287180, 9789814287180
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Nanostructures
nanofabrication
Lasers
Fabrication
lasers
interactions
industries
Chemical reactions
chemical reactions
Solid state physics
Laser applications
Laser damage
Industry
Nanoelectronics
solid state physics
Laser radiation
laser applications
Chemical industry
Welding
Chemical Industry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Nánai, L., Benkȍ, Z. I., Letfullin, R. R., & George, T. F. (2011). Laser-matter interactions: Nanostructures, fabrication and characterization. In Computational Studies of New Materials II: From Ultrafast Processes and Nanostructures to Optoelectronics, Energy Storage and Nanomedicine (pp. 1-36). World Scientific Publishing Co.. https://doi.org/10.1142/9789814287197_0001

Laser-matter interactions : Nanostructures, fabrication and characterization. / Nánai, L.; Benkȍ, Zsolt I.; Letfullin, Renat R.; George, Thomas F.

Computational Studies of New Materials II: From Ultrafast Processes and Nanostructures to Optoelectronics, Energy Storage and Nanomedicine. World Scientific Publishing Co., 2011. p. 1-36.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Nánai, L, Benkȍ, ZI, Letfullin, RR & George, TF 2011, Laser-matter interactions: Nanostructures, fabrication and characterization. in Computational Studies of New Materials II: From Ultrafast Processes and Nanostructures to Optoelectronics, Energy Storage and Nanomedicine. World Scientific Publishing Co., pp. 1-36. https://doi.org/10.1142/9789814287197_0001
Nánai L, Benkȍ ZI, Letfullin RR, George TF. Laser-matter interactions: Nanostructures, fabrication and characterization. In Computational Studies of New Materials II: From Ultrafast Processes and Nanostructures to Optoelectronics, Energy Storage and Nanomedicine. World Scientific Publishing Co. 2011. p. 1-36 https://doi.org/10.1142/9789814287197_0001
Nánai, L. ; Benkȍ, Zsolt I. ; Letfullin, Renat R. ; George, Thomas F. / Laser-matter interactions : Nanostructures, fabrication and characterization. Computational Studies of New Materials II: From Ultrafast Processes and Nanostructures to Optoelectronics, Energy Storage and Nanomedicine. World Scientific Publishing Co., 2011. pp. 1-36
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