Laser induced nanoparticle formation

P. Heszler, L. Landström

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Some aspects of nanoparticle generation are presented and compared by laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) and laser ablation (LA) techniques. LCVD generates narrow size distribution while LA yields wide size distribution of the nanoparticles. LCVD is convenient for varying the mean size of the particles by changing the partial pressure of the precursor gas, while an attractive characteristic of LA is that it is capable of producing particles from practically any kind of target material.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Pages60-73
Number of pages14
Volume5118
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003
EventNonatechnology - Maspalomas, Gran Canaria, Spain
Duration: May 19 2003May 21 2003

Other

OtherNonatechnology
CountrySpain
CityMaspalomas, Gran Canaria
Period5/19/035/21/03

Fingerprint

Laser ablation
laser ablation
Chemical vapor deposition
vapor deposition
Nanoparticles
nanoparticles
Lasers
lasers
Partial pressure
partial pressure
Gases
gases

Keywords

  • Differential mobility analyzer
  • Laser ablation
  • Laser assisted CVD
  • Nanoparticles
  • Size-distribution
  • Tungsten

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Heszler, P., & Landström, L. (2003). Laser induced nanoparticle formation. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 5118, pp. 60-73) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.498569

Laser induced nanoparticle formation. / Heszler, P.; Landström, L.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 5118 2003. p. 60-73.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Heszler, P & Landström, L 2003, Laser induced nanoparticle formation. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 5118, pp. 60-73, Nonatechnology, Maspalomas, Gran Canaria, Spain, 5/19/03. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.498569
Heszler P, Landström L. Laser induced nanoparticle formation. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 5118. 2003. p. 60-73 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.498569
Heszler, P. ; Landström, L. / Laser induced nanoparticle formation. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 5118 2003. pp. 60-73
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