L-carnitine replacement therapy in chronic valproate treatment

B. Melegh, J. Kerner, G. Acsadi, J. Lakatos, A. Sandor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ten epileptic children with chronic valproic acid (VPA) treatment were given L-carnitine for 14 days. As compared to age and sex matched control subjects the carnitine status of the VPA treated children showed carnitine insufficiency prior to the carnitine administration with lower total and free carnitine in plasma and in urine. In response to the extra intake the plasma free and esterified carnitines increased 1.7-fold. The daily excreted amount of esterified carnitines increased 6.5-fold (1.55 ± 0.23 vs 10.1 ± 1.68 μmol/kg/day, means ± SEM, p <0.005) showing that a considerable part of the administered carnitine participated in the elimination of acyl groups from the body. The depressed level of β-hydroxybutyrate in the plasma (13.8 ± 7.42 vs controls 118.0 ± 16.0 μmol/l, means ± SEM, p <0.005) remained unaffected by the carnitine administration (29.7 ± 7.06 μmol/l) suggesting that the hypoketonemia is not a direct consequence of the carnitine insufficiency. No differences were observed in the plasma level of free fatty acids, triglycerides and in insulin: glucagon ratios between the VPA treated and control subjects, suggesting that lipolysis of fats and the hepatic hormonal control mediated by these hormones are not the sites at which VPA causes reduced fasting ketogenesis. The plasma level of VPA and the seizure control remained unaffected by carnitine treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-43
Number of pages4
JournalNeuropediatrics
Volume21
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Carnitine
Valproic Acid
Therapeutics
Hydroxybutyrates
Lipolysis
Glucagon
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Fasting
Seizures
Triglycerides
Fats
Urine
Hormones
Insulin

Keywords

  • carnitine
  • fat oxidation
  • ketone bodies
  • valproic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Melegh, B., Kerner, J., Acsadi, G., Lakatos, J., & Sandor, A. (1990). L-carnitine replacement therapy in chronic valproate treatment. Neuropediatrics, 21(1), 40-43.

L-carnitine replacement therapy in chronic valproate treatment. / Melegh, B.; Kerner, J.; Acsadi, G.; Lakatos, J.; Sandor, A.

In: Neuropediatrics, Vol. 21, No. 1, 1990, p. 40-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Melegh, B, Kerner, J, Acsadi, G, Lakatos, J & Sandor, A 1990, 'L-carnitine replacement therapy in chronic valproate treatment', Neuropediatrics, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 40-43.
Melegh B, Kerner J, Acsadi G, Lakatos J, Sandor A. L-carnitine replacement therapy in chronic valproate treatment. Neuropediatrics. 1990;21(1):40-43.
Melegh, B. ; Kerner, J. ; Acsadi, G. ; Lakatos, J. ; Sandor, A. / L-carnitine replacement therapy in chronic valproate treatment. In: Neuropediatrics. 1990 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 40-43.
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