Knowledge of general practitioners on dementia and mild cognitive impairment: a cross-sectional, questionnaire study from Hungary

Nóra Imre, Réka Balogh, Edina Papp, Ildikó Kovács, Szilvia Heim, Kázmér Karádi, Ferenc Hajnal, J. Kálmán, M. Pákáski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

General practitioners (GPs) play a pivotal role in dementia recognition, yet research suggests that dementia often remains undetected in primary care. Lack of knowledge might be a major contributing factor to low recognition rates. Our objective was to address a gap in the scientific literature by exploring GPs’ knowledge on dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) for the first time in Hungary by conducting a cross-sectional, questionnaire study among practicing GPs. Recruitment of the participants (n = 402) took place at mandatory postgraduate training courses and at national GP-conferences; the applied questionnaire was self-administered and contained both open-ended and fixed-response questions. Results showed that GPs highlighted vascular and metabolic factors (38.3% of the answer items) and unhealthy lifestyle (29.1% of the answer items) as dementia risk factors. They perceived vascular dementia as the most common dementia form, followed by Alzheimer’s disease. Almost half of the respondents (44.9%) were not familiar with MCI. Most GPs identified memory problems (98.4%) and personality change (83.2%) as the leading symptoms of dementia. In summary, GPs demonstrated adequate knowledge on areas more relevant to their practices and scope of duties (risk and preventive factors, main types and symptoms of dementia); however, uncertainties were uncovered regarding epidemiology, MCI, and pharmacological therapy. As only one-fifth (19.4%) of the GPs could participate recently in dementia-focused trainings, continued education might be beneficial to improve dementia detection rates in primary care.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEducational Gerontology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Hungary
general practitioner
dementia
General Practitioners
Dementia
Cross-Sectional Studies
questionnaire
Primary Health Care
Literature
Cognitive Dysfunction
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vascular Dementia
personality change
Uncertainty
technical literature
Personality
Life Style
epidemiology
Alzheimer Disease
Epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Knowledge of general practitioners on dementia and mild cognitive impairment : a cross-sectional, questionnaire study from Hungary. / Imre, Nóra; Balogh, Réka; Papp, Edina; Kovács, Ildikó; Heim, Szilvia; Karádi, Kázmér; Hajnal, Ferenc; Kálmán, J.; Pákáski, M.

In: Educational Gerontology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Imre, Nóra ; Balogh, Réka ; Papp, Edina ; Kovács, Ildikó ; Heim, Szilvia ; Karádi, Kázmér ; Hajnal, Ferenc ; Kálmán, J. ; Pákáski, M. / Knowledge of general practitioners on dementia and mild cognitive impairment : a cross-sectional, questionnaire study from Hungary. In: Educational Gerontology. 2019.
@article{beaea1d1f44b4dc681f1333587a02727,
title = "Knowledge of general practitioners on dementia and mild cognitive impairment: a cross-sectional, questionnaire study from Hungary",
abstract = "General practitioners (GPs) play a pivotal role in dementia recognition, yet research suggests that dementia often remains undetected in primary care. Lack of knowledge might be a major contributing factor to low recognition rates. Our objective was to address a gap in the scientific literature by exploring GPs’ knowledge on dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) for the first time in Hungary by conducting a cross-sectional, questionnaire study among practicing GPs. Recruitment of the participants (n = 402) took place at mandatory postgraduate training courses and at national GP-conferences; the applied questionnaire was self-administered and contained both open-ended and fixed-response questions. Results showed that GPs highlighted vascular and metabolic factors (38.3{\%} of the answer items) and unhealthy lifestyle (29.1{\%} of the answer items) as dementia risk factors. They perceived vascular dementia as the most common dementia form, followed by Alzheimer’s disease. Almost half of the respondents (44.9{\%}) were not familiar with MCI. Most GPs identified memory problems (98.4{\%}) and personality change (83.2{\%}) as the leading symptoms of dementia. In summary, GPs demonstrated adequate knowledge on areas more relevant to their practices and scope of duties (risk and preventive factors, main types and symptoms of dementia); however, uncertainties were uncovered regarding epidemiology, MCI, and pharmacological therapy. As only one-fifth (19.4{\%}) of the GPs could participate recently in dementia-focused trainings, continued education might be beneficial to improve dementia detection rates in primary care.",
author = "N{\'o}ra Imre and R{\'e}ka Balogh and Edina Papp and Ildik{\'o} Kov{\'a}cs and Szilvia Heim and K{\'a}zm{\'e}r Kar{\'a}di and Ferenc Hajnal and J. K{\'a}lm{\'a}n and M. P{\'a}k{\'a}ski",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/03601277.2019.1660137",
language = "English",
journal = "Educational Gerontology",
issn = "0360-1277",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Knowledge of general practitioners on dementia and mild cognitive impairment

T2 - a cross-sectional, questionnaire study from Hungary

AU - Imre, Nóra

AU - Balogh, Réka

AU - Papp, Edina

AU - Kovács, Ildikó

AU - Heim, Szilvia

AU - Karádi, Kázmér

AU - Hajnal, Ferenc

AU - Kálmán, J.

AU - Pákáski, M.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - General practitioners (GPs) play a pivotal role in dementia recognition, yet research suggests that dementia often remains undetected in primary care. Lack of knowledge might be a major contributing factor to low recognition rates. Our objective was to address a gap in the scientific literature by exploring GPs’ knowledge on dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) for the first time in Hungary by conducting a cross-sectional, questionnaire study among practicing GPs. Recruitment of the participants (n = 402) took place at mandatory postgraduate training courses and at national GP-conferences; the applied questionnaire was self-administered and contained both open-ended and fixed-response questions. Results showed that GPs highlighted vascular and metabolic factors (38.3% of the answer items) and unhealthy lifestyle (29.1% of the answer items) as dementia risk factors. They perceived vascular dementia as the most common dementia form, followed by Alzheimer’s disease. Almost half of the respondents (44.9%) were not familiar with MCI. Most GPs identified memory problems (98.4%) and personality change (83.2%) as the leading symptoms of dementia. In summary, GPs demonstrated adequate knowledge on areas more relevant to their practices and scope of duties (risk and preventive factors, main types and symptoms of dementia); however, uncertainties were uncovered regarding epidemiology, MCI, and pharmacological therapy. As only one-fifth (19.4%) of the GPs could participate recently in dementia-focused trainings, continued education might be beneficial to improve dementia detection rates in primary care.

AB - General practitioners (GPs) play a pivotal role in dementia recognition, yet research suggests that dementia often remains undetected in primary care. Lack of knowledge might be a major contributing factor to low recognition rates. Our objective was to address a gap in the scientific literature by exploring GPs’ knowledge on dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) for the first time in Hungary by conducting a cross-sectional, questionnaire study among practicing GPs. Recruitment of the participants (n = 402) took place at mandatory postgraduate training courses and at national GP-conferences; the applied questionnaire was self-administered and contained both open-ended and fixed-response questions. Results showed that GPs highlighted vascular and metabolic factors (38.3% of the answer items) and unhealthy lifestyle (29.1% of the answer items) as dementia risk factors. They perceived vascular dementia as the most common dementia form, followed by Alzheimer’s disease. Almost half of the respondents (44.9%) were not familiar with MCI. Most GPs identified memory problems (98.4%) and personality change (83.2%) as the leading symptoms of dementia. In summary, GPs demonstrated adequate knowledge on areas more relevant to their practices and scope of duties (risk and preventive factors, main types and symptoms of dementia); however, uncertainties were uncovered regarding epidemiology, MCI, and pharmacological therapy. As only one-fifth (19.4%) of the GPs could participate recently in dementia-focused trainings, continued education might be beneficial to improve dementia detection rates in primary care.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85072048316&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85072048316&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/03601277.2019.1660137

DO - 10.1080/03601277.2019.1660137

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85072048316

JO - Educational Gerontology

JF - Educational Gerontology

SN - 0360-1277

ER -