Kinship network, direct childcare, and fertility among Hungarians and Gypsies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study is based on fieldwork that was conducted in a Gypsy and a Hungarian non-Gypsy population. The main goal of our study was to examine the primary factors having the largest impact on Gypsy fertility. Contrary to widespread views - based mainly on anecdotal evidence - level of education, occupational status, or use of contraceptive pills does not seem to have a profound influence on the number of births. In fact, the evidence suggests that the extensiveness of kinship networks and the degree of the relatives' assistance with childcare are most strongly predictive of fertility in the Gypsy population. Our data proved to be highly supportive of the evolutionary hypothesis that personal services through kinship networks are particularly valuable resources, accounting for the higher fertility in more traditional societies compared to technologically more advanced ones.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-298
Number of pages16
JournalEvolution and Human Behavior
Volume19
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1998

Fingerprint

Roma
child care
kinship
gipsy
Hungarian
Fertility
fertility
contraceptives
educational status
personal services
traditional society
occupational status
Contraceptive Agents
level of education
contraceptive
Population
fieldwork
evidence
assistance
Parturition

Keywords

  • Gypsy
  • Helping activities
  • Kinship
  • Reproduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Development

Cite this

Kinship network, direct childcare, and fertility among Hungarians and Gypsies. / Bereczkei, T.

In: Evolution and Human Behavior, Vol. 19, No. 5, 09.1998, p. 283-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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