Kainate receptors have different modulatory effect in seizure-like events and slow rhythmic activity in entorhinal cortex ex vivo

Katalin Szádeczky-Kardoss, Petra Varró, Attila Szűcs, Sándor Borbély, I. Világi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the neocortex, neurons form functional networks, the members of which exhibit a variable degree of synchronization. Slow rhythmic activity may be regarded as a balanced interplay of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal network activity, which is essential in learning and memory consolidation. On the other hand, seizures may be considered as hypersynchronized network states occurring in epileptic diseases. The brain slice method and multi-electrode array (MEA) systems offer a good opportunity for the modelling of cortical spontaneous activities by examining their initiation and propagation. Our main goals were to characterise and compare spontaneous activities developing in different conditions and cortical network states. The role of kainate receptors in these processes was also tested. According to our results, there are demonstrable dissimilarities between slow rhythmic activities vs. seizure-like events developing in the rat entorhinal cortex ex vivo in normal vs. epileptic conditions. Propagation velocity, time scale, activity pattern and pharmacological sensitivity are all different. Kainate receptors play a role in network activity in entorhinal cortex, they are capable to prolong the duration of the events of epileptiform activity. Their regulatory effect is more prominent under epileptic than under normal conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-288
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume153
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2019

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Kainic Acid Receptors
Entorhinal Cortex
Seizures
Neocortex
Electrodes
Learning
Pharmacology
Neurons
Brain
Memory Consolidation

Keywords

  • Activity propagation
  • Enthorhinal cortical slice
  • KAIN receptor antagonist
  • Seizure like events
  • Slow rhythmic activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Kainate receptors have different modulatory effect in seizure-like events and slow rhythmic activity in entorhinal cortex ex vivo. / Szádeczky-Kardoss, Katalin; Varró, Petra; Szűcs, Attila; Borbély, Sándor; Világi, I.

In: Brain Research Bulletin, Vol. 153, 01.11.2019, p. 279-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szádeczky-Kardoss, Katalin ; Varró, Petra ; Szűcs, Attila ; Borbély, Sándor ; Világi, I. / Kainate receptors have different modulatory effect in seizure-like events and slow rhythmic activity in entorhinal cortex ex vivo. In: Brain Research Bulletin. 2019 ; Vol. 153. pp. 279-288.
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