Janus-faced nature of light in the cold acclimation processes of maize

G. Szalai, Imre Majláth, Magda Pál, Orsoly K. Gondor, Szabolcs Rudnóy, Csilla Oláh, Radomíra Vanková, Balázs Kalapos, T. Janda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Exposure of plants to low temperature in the light may induce photoinhibitory stress symptoms, including oxidative damage. However, it is also known that light is a critical factor for the development of frost hardiness in cold tolerant plants. In the present work the effects of light during the cold acclimation period were studied in chilling-sensitive maize plants. Before exposure to chilling temperature at 5° C, plants were cold acclimated at non-lethal temperature (15° C) under different light conditions. Although exposure to relatively high light intensities during cold acclimation caused various stress symptoms, it also enhanced the effectiveness of acclimation processes to a subsequent severe cold stress. It seems that the photoinhibition induced by low temperature is a necessary evil for cold acclimation processes in plants. Greater accumulations of soluble sugars were also detected during hardening at relatively high light intensity. Certain stress responses were light-dependent not only in the leaves, but also in the roots. The comparison of the gene expression profiles based on a microarray study demonstrated that the light intensity is at least as important a factor as the temperature during the cold acclimation period. Differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in most of assimilation and metabolic pathways, namely photosynthetic light capture via the modification of chlorophyll biosynthesis and the dark reactions, carboxylic acid metabolism, cellular amino acid, porphyrin or glutathione metabolic processes, ribosome biogenesis and translation. Results revealed complex regulation mechanisms and interactions between cold and light signalling processes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number850
JournalFrontiers in Plant Science
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 19 2018

Fingerprint

Janus
acclimation
corn
light intensity
temperature
signs and symptoms (plants)
porphyrins
Calvin cycle
photoinhibition
cold stress
carboxylic acids
ribosomes
frost
cold tolerance
translation (genetics)
biochemical pathways
glutathione
assimilation (physiology)
stress response
biosynthesis

Keywords

  • Abiotic stress
  • Acclimation
  • Chilling
  • Gene expression
  • Lowtemperature
  • Photoinhibition
  • Soluble sugars
  • Zea mays L

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Janus-faced nature of light in the cold acclimation processes of maize. / Szalai, G.; Majláth, Imre; Pál, Magda; Gondor, Orsoly K.; Rudnóy, Szabolcs; Oláh, Csilla; Vanková, Radomíra; Kalapos, Balázs; Janda, T.

In: Frontiers in Plant Science, Vol. 9, 850, 19.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szalai, G, Majláth, I, Pál, M, Gondor, OK, Rudnóy, S, Oláh, C, Vanková, R, Kalapos, B & Janda, T 2018, 'Janus-faced nature of light in the cold acclimation processes of maize', Frontiers in Plant Science, vol. 9, 850. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2018.00850
Szalai, G. ; Majláth, Imre ; Pál, Magda ; Gondor, Orsoly K. ; Rudnóy, Szabolcs ; Oláh, Csilla ; Vanková, Radomíra ; Kalapos, Balázs ; Janda, T. / Janus-faced nature of light in the cold acclimation processes of maize. In: Frontiers in Plant Science. 2018 ; Vol. 9.
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