Ixodes ricinus and its transmitted pathogens in urban and peri-urban areas in Europe: New hazards and relevance for public health

Annapaola Rizzoli, Cornelia Silaghi, Anna Obiegala, Ivo Rudolf, Zdeněk Hubálek, G. Földvári, Olivier Plantard, Muriel Vayssier-Taussat, Sarah Bonnet, Eva Špitalská, Mária Kazimírová

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

187 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tick-borne diseases represent major public and animal health issues worldwide. Ixodes ricinus, primarily associated with deciduous and mixed forests, is the principal vector of causative agents of viral, bacterial, and protozoan zoonotic diseases in Europe. Recently, abundant tick populations have been observed in European urban green areas, which are of public health relevance due to the exposure of humans and domesticated animals to potentially infected ticks. In urban habitats, small and medium-sized mammals, birds, companion animals (dogs and cats), and larger mammals (roe deer and wild boar) play a role in maintenance of tick populations and as reservoirs of tick-borne pathogens. Presence of ticks infected with tick-borne encephalitis virus and high prevalence of ticks infected with Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., causing Lyme borreliosis, have been reported from urbanized areas in Europe. Emerging pathogens, including bacteria of the order Rickettsiales (Anaplasma phagocytophilum, "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis," Rickettsia helvetica, and R. monacensis), Borrelia miyamotoi, and protozoans (Babesia divergens, B. venatorum, and B. microti) have also been detected in urban tick populations. Understanding the ecology of ticks and their associations with hosts in a European urbanized environment is crucial to quantify parameters necessary for risk pre-assessment and identification of public health strategies for control and prevention of tick-borne diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Article number251
JournalFrontiers in Public Health
Volume2
Issue numberDEC
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Ixodes
Ticks
Public Health
Tick-Borne Diseases
Mammals
Anaplasma phagocytophilum
Tick-Borne Encephalitis Viruses
Borrelia
Babesia
Rickettsia
Sus scrofa
Arvicolinae
Borrelia burgdorferi
Deer
Urban Population
Lyme Disease
Pets
Domestic Animals
Zoonoses
Ecology

Keywords

  • Europe
  • Ixodes ricinus
  • Tick-borne pathogens
  • Ticks
  • Urban habitats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ixodes ricinus and its transmitted pathogens in urban and peri-urban areas in Europe : New hazards and relevance for public health. / Rizzoli, Annapaola; Silaghi, Cornelia; Obiegala, Anna; Rudolf, Ivo; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Földvári, G.; Plantard, Olivier; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Bonnet, Sarah; Špitalská, Eva; Kazimírová, Mária.

In: Frontiers in Public Health, Vol. 2, No. DEC, 251, 01.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Rizzoli, A, Silaghi, C, Obiegala, A, Rudolf, I, Hubálek, Z, Földvári, G, Plantard, O, Vayssier-Taussat, M, Bonnet, S, Špitalská, E & Kazimírová, M 2014, 'Ixodes ricinus and its transmitted pathogens in urban and peri-urban areas in Europe: New hazards and relevance for public health', Frontiers in Public Health, vol. 2, no. DEC, 251. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2014.00251
Rizzoli, Annapaola ; Silaghi, Cornelia ; Obiegala, Anna ; Rudolf, Ivo ; Hubálek, Zdeněk ; Földvári, G. ; Plantard, Olivier ; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel ; Bonnet, Sarah ; Špitalská, Eva ; Kazimírová, Mária. / Ixodes ricinus and its transmitted pathogens in urban and peri-urban areas in Europe : New hazards and relevance for public health. In: Frontiers in Public Health. 2014 ; Vol. 2, No. DEC.
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