Is There any difference between the findings of clock drawing tests if the clocks show different times?

Anna Tünde Patocskai, M. Pákáski, Gábor Vincze, Máté Fullajtár, Irma Szimjanovszki, Gergely Drótos, K. Boda, Z. Janka, J. Kálmán

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a widely-used, rapid assessment tool for the screening of cognitive decline though its evaluation and interpretation are still not uniform. The aim of present study was to investigate the difference in sensitivity and specificity of two types of CDTs and to compare the clinical benefits of quantitative and semiquantitative scoring systems. Objective: To investigate the difference in sensitivity and specificity of two types of CDTs and to compare the clinical benefits of quantitative and semiquantitative scoring systems. Methods: Six hundred and ninety-two participants with or without dementia completed 10-item CDTs in nursing homes in two counties in southern Hungary. The dementia was not further subclassified. The results of the two tests, CDT1 (representing five minutes to a quarter to four) and CDT2 (representing ten past five), were evaluated quantitatively and semiquantitatively. Results: In the quantitative evaluation, the sensitivity and the specificity for the diagnosis of dementia at cut-off scores of 7 points were determined: 87.1% and 51.9%, respectively, for CDT1, and 81.7% and 57% for CDT2, respectively. The semiquantitative analysis revealed a sensitivity of 67.3% and a specificity of 65.3% for CDT1, and of 64.6% and 66.6% for CDT2, respectively. Conclusion: The results of CDT tests do not appear to depend on the positions of the clock hands and additionally suggest that the quantitative evaluation method is more sensitive than the semiquantitative method.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)749-757
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Dementia
Sensitivity and Specificity
Hungary
Nursing Homes
Hand
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Clock drawing test
  • cognitive disorders
  • dementia
  • early diagnosis
  • sensitivity
  • specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Is There any difference between the findings of clock drawing tests if the clocks show different times? / Patocskai, Anna Tünde; Pákáski, M.; Vincze, Gábor; Fullajtár, Máté; Szimjanovszki, Irma; Drótos, Gergely; Boda, K.; Janka, Z.; Kálmán, J.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 39, No. 4, 2014, p. 749-757.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patocskai, Anna Tünde ; Pákáski, M. ; Vincze, Gábor ; Fullajtár, Máté ; Szimjanovszki, Irma ; Drótos, Gergely ; Boda, K. ; Janka, Z. ; Kálmán, J. / Is There any difference between the findings of clock drawing tests if the clocks show different times?. In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 4. pp. 749-757.
@article{1cf7a9a8acc249cd986937f12ade2233,
title = "Is There any difference between the findings of clock drawing tests if the clocks show different times?",
abstract = "Background: The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a widely-used, rapid assessment tool for the screening of cognitive decline though its evaluation and interpretation are still not uniform. The aim of present study was to investigate the difference in sensitivity and specificity of two types of CDTs and to compare the clinical benefits of quantitative and semiquantitative scoring systems. Objective: To investigate the difference in sensitivity and specificity of two types of CDTs and to compare the clinical benefits of quantitative and semiquantitative scoring systems. Methods: Six hundred and ninety-two participants with or without dementia completed 10-item CDTs in nursing homes in two counties in southern Hungary. The dementia was not further subclassified. The results of the two tests, CDT1 (representing five minutes to a quarter to four) and CDT2 (representing ten past five), were evaluated quantitatively and semiquantitatively. Results: In the quantitative evaluation, the sensitivity and the specificity for the diagnosis of dementia at cut-off scores of 7 points were determined: 87.1{\%} and 51.9{\%}, respectively, for CDT1, and 81.7{\%} and 57{\%} for CDT2, respectively. The semiquantitative analysis revealed a sensitivity of 67.3{\%} and a specificity of 65.3{\%} for CDT1, and of 64.6{\%} and 66.6{\%} for CDT2, respectively. Conclusion: The results of CDT tests do not appear to depend on the positions of the clock hands and additionally suggest that the quantitative evaluation method is more sensitive than the semiquantitative method.",
keywords = "Clock drawing test, cognitive disorders, dementia, early diagnosis, sensitivity, specificity",
author = "Patocskai, {Anna T{\"u}nde} and M. P{\'a}k{\'a}ski and G{\'a}bor Vincze and M{\'a}t{\'e} Fullajt{\'a}r and Irma Szimjanovszki and Gergely Dr{\'o}tos and K. Boda and Z. Janka and J. K{\'a}lm{\'a}n",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.3233/JAD-131313",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "749--757",
journal = "Journal of Alzheimer's Disease",
issn = "1387-2877",
publisher = "IOS Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is There any difference between the findings of clock drawing tests if the clocks show different times?

AU - Patocskai, Anna Tünde

AU - Pákáski, M.

AU - Vincze, Gábor

AU - Fullajtár, Máté

AU - Szimjanovszki, Irma

AU - Drótos, Gergely

AU - Boda, K.

AU - Janka, Z.

AU - Kálmán, J.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background: The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a widely-used, rapid assessment tool for the screening of cognitive decline though its evaluation and interpretation are still not uniform. The aim of present study was to investigate the difference in sensitivity and specificity of two types of CDTs and to compare the clinical benefits of quantitative and semiquantitative scoring systems. Objective: To investigate the difference in sensitivity and specificity of two types of CDTs and to compare the clinical benefits of quantitative and semiquantitative scoring systems. Methods: Six hundred and ninety-two participants with or without dementia completed 10-item CDTs in nursing homes in two counties in southern Hungary. The dementia was not further subclassified. The results of the two tests, CDT1 (representing five minutes to a quarter to four) and CDT2 (representing ten past five), were evaluated quantitatively and semiquantitatively. Results: In the quantitative evaluation, the sensitivity and the specificity for the diagnosis of dementia at cut-off scores of 7 points were determined: 87.1% and 51.9%, respectively, for CDT1, and 81.7% and 57% for CDT2, respectively. The semiquantitative analysis revealed a sensitivity of 67.3% and a specificity of 65.3% for CDT1, and of 64.6% and 66.6% for CDT2, respectively. Conclusion: The results of CDT tests do not appear to depend on the positions of the clock hands and additionally suggest that the quantitative evaluation method is more sensitive than the semiquantitative method.

AB - Background: The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a widely-used, rapid assessment tool for the screening of cognitive decline though its evaluation and interpretation are still not uniform. The aim of present study was to investigate the difference in sensitivity and specificity of two types of CDTs and to compare the clinical benefits of quantitative and semiquantitative scoring systems. Objective: To investigate the difference in sensitivity and specificity of two types of CDTs and to compare the clinical benefits of quantitative and semiquantitative scoring systems. Methods: Six hundred and ninety-two participants with or without dementia completed 10-item CDTs in nursing homes in two counties in southern Hungary. The dementia was not further subclassified. The results of the two tests, CDT1 (representing five minutes to a quarter to four) and CDT2 (representing ten past five), were evaluated quantitatively and semiquantitatively. Results: In the quantitative evaluation, the sensitivity and the specificity for the diagnosis of dementia at cut-off scores of 7 points were determined: 87.1% and 51.9%, respectively, for CDT1, and 81.7% and 57% for CDT2, respectively. The semiquantitative analysis revealed a sensitivity of 67.3% and a specificity of 65.3% for CDT1, and of 64.6% and 66.6% for CDT2, respectively. Conclusion: The results of CDT tests do not appear to depend on the positions of the clock hands and additionally suggest that the quantitative evaluation method is more sensitive than the semiquantitative method.

KW - Clock drawing test

KW - cognitive disorders

KW - dementia

KW - early diagnosis

KW - sensitivity

KW - specificity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84896893981&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84896893981&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3233/JAD-131313

DO - 10.3233/JAD-131313

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 749

EP - 757

JO - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

JF - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

SN - 1387-2877

IS - 4

ER -