Is there a role of inducible nitric oxide synthase activation in the delayed antiarrhythmic effect of sodium nitrite?

Vivien Demeter-Haludka, László Juhász, Mária Kovác, J. Gardi, A. Végh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to examine whether inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a role in the delayed antiarrhythmic effect of sodium nitrite. Twenty-one dogs were infused intravenously with sodium nitrite (0.2 μmol·kg–1·min–1) for 20 min, either in the absence (n = 12) or in the presence of the iNOS inhibitor S-(2-aminoethyl)-isothiourea (AEST) (total dose 2.0 mg·kg–1 i.v., n = 9). Control dogs (n = 12) were given saline. Twenty-four hours later, all of the dogs were subjected to a 25 min period occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery followed by rapid reperfusion. Dogs treated with AEST and nitrite received again AEST prior to the occlusion. Compared with the controls, sodium nitrite markedly reduced the number of ectopic beats, the number and incidence of ventricular tachycardia, and the incidence of ventricular fibrillation during occlusion and increased survival (0% versus 50%) from the combined ischaemia and reperfusion insult. Although AEST completely inhibited iNOS activity, the nitrite-induced increase in NO bioavailability during occlusion was not substantially modified. Furthermore, AEST attenuated but did not completely abolish the antiarrhythmic effect of nitrite. The marked delayed antiarrhythmic effect of sodium nitrite is not entirely due to the activation of iNOS; other mechanisms may certainly play a role.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)447-454
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Volume95
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

beta-Aminoethyl Isothiourea
Sodium Nitrite
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Nitrites
Dogs
Reperfusion
Incidence
Ventricular Fibrillation
Ventricular Tachycardia
Biological Availability
Coronary Vessels
Ischemia

Keywords

  • Arrhythmias
  • Delayed protection
  • Ischaemia-reperfusion
  • Nitric oxide
  • Sodium nitrite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Pharmacology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Is there a role of inducible nitric oxide synthase activation in the delayed antiarrhythmic effect of sodium nitrite? / Demeter-Haludka, Vivien; Juhász, László; Kovác, Mária; Gardi, J.; Végh, A.

In: Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, Vol. 95, No. 4, 01.01.2017, p. 447-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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