Is Dichogaster bolaui (Michaelsen, 1891) the first domicole earthworm species?

C. Csuzdi, T. Pavlíček, E. Nevo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The term domicole, derived from the Latin domus (house) and colere (to inhabit), applies to species that are able (or adapted) to live in urban dwellings. Examples of domicole species include, for example, Psocoptera (dust lice) and Arachnida (spiders). However, so far, no earthworm species has been described as being capable of adapting to this type of niche. It seems, however, that the tropical species Dichogaster bolaui (Michaelsen, 1891) might be the first earthworm species to be defined as a domicole species. D. bolaui is native to eastern Africa. However, it has a wide distribution in tropical and subtropical regions. Additionally, it has been recorded in greenhouses in temperate countries and has also been observed in bathtubs and toilet bowls in Finland and Sweden. We collected data regarding the abundant presence of this species in bathtubs, showers, and sewer pipes in a student dormitory in Szombathely, Hungary, and in a private house in Haifa, Israel. Our data suggest that D. bolaui independently colonized the sewerage systems several times and established breeding populations and, therefore, has become a domicole.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-201
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Soil Biology
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

Fingerprint

Oligochaeta
earthworms
earthworm
Arachnida
sewage systems
Phthiraptera
Eastern Africa
Spiders
Hungary
lice
Israel
Finland
pipes
Dust
subtropics
Sweden
dust
Breeding
Araneae
tropics

Keywords

  • Acanthodrilidae
  • Dichogaster bolaui
  • Domicole
  • Earthworms
  • Sewage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Ecology

Cite this

Is Dichogaster bolaui (Michaelsen, 1891) the first domicole earthworm species? / Csuzdi, C.; Pavlíček, T.; Nevo, E.

In: European Journal of Soil Biology, Vol. 44, No. 2, 03.2008, p. 198-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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