Investigation of quality improving of waste origin Bio-Paraffins

Péter Solymosi, Géza Varga, J. Hancsók

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The liquid engine fuels are the main power source of the transportation in the passenger sector. Within this, the waste originated engine fuels can play the main role to achieve the prediction of EU, to reach the 10 % ratio of the renewable fuels until 2020. Thus the sustainable and environmental friendly production of this components is momentous. To achieve all this goals the European Union created the 2003/30/EC and further the 2009/28/EC Directives to encourage the bio components blending in the engine fuels. Nowadays the research, development and market entry of the second generation or new generation biofuels are under introduction. The main reason is the demand for better quality fuels and wider raw material basis. All of these above mentioned reasons explain the investigation of unconventional feedstocks which do not endanger the security of food supplement and/or can be processed with lower operation costs. For example these feedstocks can be non-edible hybrids such as rapeseed oils with high euric acid content obtained from special hybrids of rape (e.g. Brassica Napus) or high oleic acid containing oil sunflowers (Saaten Union Capella) waste lards (used cooking oil, slaughterhouse lards) or raw materials from long term unused agricultural area (abandoned area). The precondition of availability is the sustainable and the technical compatibility with running engine and vehicle construction, thus this bio components can be blended in the motor fuels unlimited quantity. Considering the utilization properties of currently used first generation biofuels, the maximum amount of biocomponent in the applied motor is 10 % bioethanol in the case of gasoline and 7 % fatty acid methyl ester in the case of diesel fuels. One of the reliable production technology of second generation biofules which can be blended into diesel fuels is the heterogenic catalytic hydrogenation of triglycerides and waste lards. In this context we studied the heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of used cooking oils on aluminium-oxide supported transition metal catalyst. The applied operation parameters were the following: temperature: 320 - 380 °C, pressure: 20 - 80 bar, LHSV: 1.0 h-1, H2/hydrocarbon ratio: 600 Nm3/m3. The yield of gas oil boiling range products at the favourable operation parameters was close to the theoretical yield (80 - 90 %). The quality characteristics of these products were very favourable; for example the cetane number was higher than 75, the aromatic content was lower than 0.1 % and the sulphur content was lower than 5 mg/kg. To sum it up, the quality characteristics satisfied the CWA 15940:2009 (9th March) NSAI standard's (Automotive fuels - Paraffinic Diesel from synthesis gas hydrotreatment - Requirements and test methods) requirements. The actual EN 590:2013 standard does not limit the blending rate of these bio components, while on the other hand the blending of biodiesel (fatty-acid-methyl ester) is limited (max 7 v/v%). Consequently these products which were obtained by catalytic hydrogenation of vegetable oils can be blended in gasoil up to 10 %, and this way we can meet the requirements of the EU which prescribe at least 10-80 % bio component blending in motor fuels by 2020.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1387-1392
Number of pages6
JournalChemical Engineering Transactions
Volume39
Issue numberSpecial Issue
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Paraffin
Paraffins
Biofuels
Hydrogenation
Engines
Cooking
Diesel fuels
Fatty acids
Feedstocks
Esters
Raw materials
Oils
Fatty Acids
Sunflower oil
Automotive fuels
Bioethanol
Antiknock rating
Plant Oils
Oleic acid
Aluminum Oxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Investigation of quality improving of waste origin Bio-Paraffins. / Solymosi, Péter; Varga, Géza; Hancsók, J.

In: Chemical Engineering Transactions, Vol. 39, No. Special Issue, 2014, p. 1387-1392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Solymosi, Péter ; Varga, Géza ; Hancsók, J. / Investigation of quality improving of waste origin Bio-Paraffins. In: Chemical Engineering Transactions. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. Special Issue. pp. 1387-1392.
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