Investigating jealous behaviour in dogs

Judit Abdai, Cristina Baño Terencio, Paula Pérez Fraga, A. Miklósi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The function of jealous behaviour is to facilitate the maintenance of an important social relationship that is threatened by a third-party, a rival individual. Although jealous behaviour has an important function in gregarious species, it has been investigated almost exclusively in humans. Based on functional similarity between dog-owner and mother-infant attachments, we hypothesised that jealous behaviour can be evoked in dogs, similarly to children. In our study owners focused their attention solely on the test partner, while they ignored their dog. We deployed familiar and unfamiliar dogs as social test partners, and familiar and unfamiliar objects as non-social test partners; all subjects encountered all test partners. Dogs showed more jealous behaviour, i.e. owner-oriented behaviour and attempts to separate the owner and test partner in case of social compared to non-social test partners. Results suggest that jealous behaviour emerges in dogs, and it is functionally similar to that in children observed in similar situations. Alternative explanations like territoriality, dominance rank can be excluded.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8911
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2018

Fingerprint

Dogs
Territoriality
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Investigating jealous behaviour in dogs. / Abdai, Judit; Baño Terencio, Cristina; Pérez Fraga, Paula; Miklósi, A.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, No. 1, 8911, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdai, J, Baño Terencio, C, Pérez Fraga, P & Miklósi, A 2018, 'Investigating jealous behaviour in dogs', Scientific Reports, vol. 8, no. 1, 8911. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-27251-1
Abdai, Judit ; Baño Terencio, Cristina ; Pérez Fraga, Paula ; Miklósi, A. / Investigating jealous behaviour in dogs. In: Scientific Reports. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
@article{f42d4e21d03a4002abcee6e3efbba74b,
title = "Investigating jealous behaviour in dogs",
abstract = "The function of jealous behaviour is to facilitate the maintenance of an important social relationship that is threatened by a third-party, a rival individual. Although jealous behaviour has an important function in gregarious species, it has been investigated almost exclusively in humans. Based on functional similarity between dog-owner and mother-infant attachments, we hypothesised that jealous behaviour can be evoked in dogs, similarly to children. In our study owners focused their attention solely on the test partner, while they ignored their dog. We deployed familiar and unfamiliar dogs as social test partners, and familiar and unfamiliar objects as non-social test partners; all subjects encountered all test partners. Dogs showed more jealous behaviour, i.e. owner-oriented behaviour and attempts to separate the owner and test partner in case of social compared to non-social test partners. Results suggest that jealous behaviour emerges in dogs, and it is functionally similar to that in children observed in similar situations. Alternative explanations like territoriality, dominance rank can be excluded.",
author = "Judit Abdai and {Ba{\~n}o Terencio}, Cristina and {P{\'e}rez Fraga}, Paula and A. Mikl{\'o}si",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41598-018-27251-1",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Investigating jealous behaviour in dogs

AU - Abdai, Judit

AU - Baño Terencio, Cristina

AU - Pérez Fraga, Paula

AU - Miklósi, A.

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - The function of jealous behaviour is to facilitate the maintenance of an important social relationship that is threatened by a third-party, a rival individual. Although jealous behaviour has an important function in gregarious species, it has been investigated almost exclusively in humans. Based on functional similarity between dog-owner and mother-infant attachments, we hypothesised that jealous behaviour can be evoked in dogs, similarly to children. In our study owners focused their attention solely on the test partner, while they ignored their dog. We deployed familiar and unfamiliar dogs as social test partners, and familiar and unfamiliar objects as non-social test partners; all subjects encountered all test partners. Dogs showed more jealous behaviour, i.e. owner-oriented behaviour and attempts to separate the owner and test partner in case of social compared to non-social test partners. Results suggest that jealous behaviour emerges in dogs, and it is functionally similar to that in children observed in similar situations. Alternative explanations like territoriality, dominance rank can be excluded.

AB - The function of jealous behaviour is to facilitate the maintenance of an important social relationship that is threatened by a third-party, a rival individual. Although jealous behaviour has an important function in gregarious species, it has been investigated almost exclusively in humans. Based on functional similarity between dog-owner and mother-infant attachments, we hypothesised that jealous behaviour can be evoked in dogs, similarly to children. In our study owners focused their attention solely on the test partner, while they ignored their dog. We deployed familiar and unfamiliar dogs as social test partners, and familiar and unfamiliar objects as non-social test partners; all subjects encountered all test partners. Dogs showed more jealous behaviour, i.e. owner-oriented behaviour and attempts to separate the owner and test partner in case of social compared to non-social test partners. Results suggest that jealous behaviour emerges in dogs, and it is functionally similar to that in children observed in similar situations. Alternative explanations like territoriality, dominance rank can be excluded.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048346095&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048346095&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-018-27251-1

DO - 10.1038/s41598-018-27251-1

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85048346095

VL - 8

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 1

M1 - 8911

ER -