Invasive earthworm species and nitrogen cycling in remnant forest patches

Katalin Szlavecz, Sarah A. Placella, Richard V. Pouyat, Peter M. Groffman, C. Csuzdi, Ian Yesilonis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Invasive non-native earthworms in forested areas of the northeastern United States are of concern since they have the potential to greatly change the nutrient dynamics of these ecosystems. Urban landscapes are particularly susceptible to non-native species invasions. In this study, we assessed earthworm communities and nitrogen transformations rates in urban and rural forest patches of the Greater Baltimore Metropolitan area, USA. We expected to observe a mixture of native and non-native species at the sites because the region has never been glaciated. The fauna was dominated by European lumbricids. Density and biomass varied between 5 and 288 ind m-2 and 5.2 and 144.0 g m-2, respectively, with urban forests having higher abundances than rural forests. In laboratory incubations, urban forest soils had higher potential N-transformation rates. Both N-mineralization and nitrification rates were positively correlated with soil pH. However, controls on earthworm communities and N-cycling are complex in the Baltimore region, because parent material and soil type also change along the urban-rural gradient. Further studies will separate out land use and inherent soil controls on earthworm populations and N-transformation rates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-62
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Soil Ecology
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006

Fingerprint

Introduced Species
Oligochaeta
earthworms
earthworm
Nitrogen
Soil
nitrogen
Baltimore
urban soils
Northeastern United States
nutrient dynamics
Nitrification
parent material
New England
nitrification
forest soils
forest soil
metropolitan area
soil pH
soil type

Keywords

  • Earthworm invasion
  • N-mineralization
  • Nitrification
  • Nitrogen cycling
  • Urban forest soil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Soil Science
  • Ecology

Cite this

Szlavecz, K., Placella, S. A., Pouyat, R. V., Groffman, P. M., Csuzdi, C., & Yesilonis, I. (2006). Invasive earthworm species and nitrogen cycling in remnant forest patches. Applied Soil Ecology, 32(1), 54-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsoil.2005.01.006

Invasive earthworm species and nitrogen cycling in remnant forest patches. / Szlavecz, Katalin; Placella, Sarah A.; Pouyat, Richard V.; Groffman, Peter M.; Csuzdi, C.; Yesilonis, Ian.

In: Applied Soil Ecology, Vol. 32, No. 1, 05.2006, p. 54-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szlavecz, K, Placella, SA, Pouyat, RV, Groffman, PM, Csuzdi, C & Yesilonis, I 2006, 'Invasive earthworm species and nitrogen cycling in remnant forest patches', Applied Soil Ecology, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 54-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsoil.2005.01.006
Szlavecz, Katalin ; Placella, Sarah A. ; Pouyat, Richard V. ; Groffman, Peter M. ; Csuzdi, C. ; Yesilonis, Ian. / Invasive earthworm species and nitrogen cycling in remnant forest patches. In: Applied Soil Ecology. 2006 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 54-62.
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