Introduction

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Abstract

Classical physics-the contrary to quantum-means all those fundamental dynamical phenomena and their theories which became known until the end of the nineteenth century, from our studying the macroscopic world. Galileo's, Newton's, and Maxwell's consecutive achievements, built one on top of the other, obtained their most compact formulation in terms of the classical canonical dynamics. At the same time, the conjecture of the atomic structure of the microworld was also conceived. By extending the classical dynamics to atomic degrees of freedom, certain microscopic phenomena also appearing at the macroscopic level could be explained correctly. This yielded indirect, yet sufficient, proof of the atomic structure. But other phenomena of the microworld (e.g., the spectral lines of atoms) resisted the natural extension of the classical theory to the microscopic degrees of freedom

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalLecture Notes in Physics
Volume827
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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atomic structure
degrees of freedom
newton
line spectra
formulations
physics
atoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Introduction. / Diósi, L.

In: Lecture Notes in Physics, Vol. 827, 2011, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diósi, L. / Introduction. In: Lecture Notes in Physics. 2011 ; Vol. 827. pp. 1-5.
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