Intrinsically disordered segments affect protein half-life in the cell and during evolution

Robin van der Lee, Benjamin Lang, Kai Kruse, Jörg Gsponer, Natalia Sánchezde de Groot, Martijn A. Huynen, Andreas Matouschek, M. Fuxreiter, M. Madan Babu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Precise control of protein turnover is essential for cellular homeostasis. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is well established as a major regulator of protein degradation, but an understanding of how inherent structural features influence the lifetimes of proteins is lacking. We report that yeast, mouse, and human proteins with terminal or internal intrinsically disordered segments have significantly shorter half-lives than proteins without these features. The lengths of the disordered segments that affect protein half-life are compatible with the structure of the proteasome. Divergence in terminal and internal disordered segments in yeast proteins originating from gene duplication leads to significantly altered half-life. Many paralogs that are affected by such changes participate in signaling, where altered protein half-life will directly impact cellular processes and function. Thus, natural variation in the length and position of disordered segments may affect protein half-life and could serve as an underappreciated source of genetic variation with important phenotypic consequences. •Genomic principles describing how disordered segments influence protein half-life•Proteins with terminal or internal disordered segments have a short half-life•The relationship is evolutionarily conserved between yeast, mouse, and human•Divergence in disordered segments after gene duplication impacts protein half-life. Cellular function requires precise adjustment of protein concentrations. Protein degradation is the endpoint of gene expression and thus a primary determinant of protein abundance. Van der Lee etal. report that the length and number of disordered regions in substrates are two fundamental genetic and evolvable parameters that affect protein half-life and hence protein abundance in cells. They suggest that natural variation in disordered segments of proteins may serve as an underappreciated source of genetic variation with important phenotypic consequences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1832-1844
Number of pages13
JournalCell Reports
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 25 2014

Fingerprint

Half-Life
Proteins
Gene Duplication
Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
Proteolysis
Yeast
Yeasts
Genes
Fungal Proteins
Degradation
Ubiquitin
Gene expression
Homeostasis
Gene Expression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

van der Lee, R., Lang, B., Kruse, K., Gsponer, J., de Groot, N. S., Huynen, M. A., ... Babu, M. M. (2014). Intrinsically disordered segments affect protein half-life in the cell and during evolution. Cell Reports, 8(6), 1832-1844. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.07.055

Intrinsically disordered segments affect protein half-life in the cell and during evolution. / van der Lee, Robin; Lang, Benjamin; Kruse, Kai; Gsponer, Jörg; de Groot, Natalia Sánchezde; Huynen, Martijn A.; Matouschek, Andreas; Fuxreiter, M.; Babu, M. Madan.

In: Cell Reports, Vol. 8, No. 6, 25.09.2014, p. 1832-1844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

van der Lee, R, Lang, B, Kruse, K, Gsponer, J, de Groot, NS, Huynen, MA, Matouschek, A, Fuxreiter, M & Babu, MM 2014, 'Intrinsically disordered segments affect protein half-life in the cell and during evolution', Cell Reports, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 1832-1844. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.07.055
van der Lee R, Lang B, Kruse K, Gsponer J, de Groot NS, Huynen MA et al. Intrinsically disordered segments affect protein half-life in the cell and during evolution. Cell Reports. 2014 Sep 25;8(6):1832-1844. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.07.055
van der Lee, Robin ; Lang, Benjamin ; Kruse, Kai ; Gsponer, Jörg ; de Groot, Natalia Sánchezde ; Huynen, Martijn A. ; Matouschek, Andreas ; Fuxreiter, M. ; Babu, M. Madan. / Intrinsically disordered segments affect protein half-life in the cell and during evolution. In: Cell Reports. 2014 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 1832-1844.
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