Intravenous adenosine selectively increases blood flow to xenotransplanted intracerebral gliomas

P. C. Warnke, P. Molnár, D. D. Bigner, D. H. Heistad, D. R. Groothuis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Adenosine was infused intravenously at 10 μmol/(kg. min) into athymic (“nude”) rats with intracerebral D-54MG xenotransplanted brain tumors, in an attempt to increase tumor blood flow. Cerebral blood flow (F) was measured with 14C-iodoantipyrine and quantitative autoradiography. Mean arterial blood pressure was 95 ± 9.4 (SE) mm Hg in the adenosine group and 112 ± 6.0 mm Hg in the controls. Averaged mean whole tumor F was significantly higher in adenosine-treated brain tumors (117.6 ± 20.8ml/[hg. min]) than in controls (62.2 ± 9.7ml/[hg. min]). Regionally, there were significant increases of F in tumor periphery and brain around tumor, but not in tumor center or any tumor-free brain regions. Focal values of F <5 ml/(hg. min) were present in some necrotic regions of adenosine-treated tumors. These results, obtained in unanesthetized rats with transplanted gliomas from a human cell line, confirm our earlier observations in avian sarcoma virus-induced brain sarcomas in dogs, and suggest that adenosine or perhaps other vasodilators could be used to selectively increase the delivery of lipid-soluble chemotherapeutic drugs to brain tumors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1870-1873
Number of pages4
JournalNeurology
Volume37
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 1987

Fingerprint

Brain Neoplasms
Glioma
Adenosine
Nude Rats
Neoplasms
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Arterial Pressure
Avian Sarcoma Viruses
Autoradiography
Vasodilator Agents
Sarcoma
Blood
Brain Tumor
Dogs
Lipids
Cell Line
Brain
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Warnke, P. C., Molnár, P., Bigner, D. D., Heistad, D. H., & Groothuis, D. R. (1987). Intravenous adenosine selectively increases blood flow to xenotransplanted intracerebral gliomas. Neurology, 37(12), 1870-1873.

Intravenous adenosine selectively increases blood flow to xenotransplanted intracerebral gliomas. / Warnke, P. C.; Molnár, P.; Bigner, D. D.; Heistad, D. H.; Groothuis, D. R.

In: Neurology, Vol. 37, No. 12, 1987, p. 1870-1873.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Warnke, PC, Molnár, P, Bigner, DD, Heistad, DH & Groothuis, DR 1987, 'Intravenous adenosine selectively increases blood flow to xenotransplanted intracerebral gliomas', Neurology, vol. 37, no. 12, pp. 1870-1873.
Warnke, P. C. ; Molnár, P. ; Bigner, D. D. ; Heistad, D. H. ; Groothuis, D. R. / Intravenous adenosine selectively increases blood flow to xenotransplanted intracerebral gliomas. In: Neurology. 1987 ; Vol. 37, No. 12. pp. 1870-1873.
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