Intraspecific variation in behaviour: Effects of evolutionary history, ontogenetic experience and sex

G. Herczeg, K. Välimäki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Geographical variation in behaviour within species is common. However, how behavioural plasticity varies between and within locally adapted populations is less studied. Here, we studied behavioural plasticity induced by perceived predation risk and food availability in pond (low predation - high competition) vs. coastal marine (high predation - low competition) nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius) reared in a common garden experiment. Pond sticklebacks were more active feeders, more risk-taking, aggressive and explorative than marine sticklebacks. Perceived predation risk decreased aggression and risk-taking of all fish. Food restriction increased feeding activity and risk-taking. Pond sticklebacks became more risk-taking than marine sticklebacks under food shortage, whereas well-fed fish behaved similarly. Among poorly fed fish, males showed higher drive to feed, whereas among well-fed fish, females did. Apart from showing how evolutionary history, ontogenetic experience and sex influence behaviour, the results provide evidence for habitat-dependent expression of adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2434-2444
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

Fingerprint

Gasterosteidae
intraspecific variation
history
pond
gender
predation
fish feeds
predation risk
fish
plasticity
food
Pungitius pungitius
phenotypic plasticity
geographical variation
aggression
food availability
food shortages
garden
risk reduction
gardens

Keywords

  • Behavioural evolution
  • Behavioural plasticity
  • Competition
  • Local adaptation
  • Phenotypic plasticity
  • Predation
  • Pungitius
  • Stickleback

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Intraspecific variation in behaviour : Effects of evolutionary history, ontogenetic experience and sex. / Herczeg, G.; Välimäki, K.

In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 24, No. 11, 11.2011, p. 2434-2444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b8d871cb3e6f4675813ebbaf9da07e09,
title = "Intraspecific variation in behaviour: Effects of evolutionary history, ontogenetic experience and sex",
abstract = "Geographical variation in behaviour within species is common. However, how behavioural plasticity varies between and within locally adapted populations is less studied. Here, we studied behavioural plasticity induced by perceived predation risk and food availability in pond (low predation - high competition) vs. coastal marine (high predation - low competition) nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius) reared in a common garden experiment. Pond sticklebacks were more active feeders, more risk-taking, aggressive and explorative than marine sticklebacks. Perceived predation risk decreased aggression and risk-taking of all fish. Food restriction increased feeding activity and risk-taking. Pond sticklebacks became more risk-taking than marine sticklebacks under food shortage, whereas well-fed fish behaved similarly. Among poorly fed fish, males showed higher drive to feed, whereas among well-fed fish, females did. Apart from showing how evolutionary history, ontogenetic experience and sex influence behaviour, the results provide evidence for habitat-dependent expression of adaptive phenotypic plasticity.",
keywords = "Behavioural evolution, Behavioural plasticity, Competition, Local adaptation, Phenotypic plasticity, Predation, Pungitius, Stickleback",
author = "G. Herczeg and K. V{\"a}lim{\"a}ki",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1111/j.1420-9101.2011.02371.x",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "2434--2444",
journal = "Journal of Evolutionary Biology",
issn = "1010-061X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intraspecific variation in behaviour

T2 - Effects of evolutionary history, ontogenetic experience and sex

AU - Herczeg, G.

AU - Välimäki, K.

PY - 2011/11

Y1 - 2011/11

N2 - Geographical variation in behaviour within species is common. However, how behavioural plasticity varies between and within locally adapted populations is less studied. Here, we studied behavioural plasticity induced by perceived predation risk and food availability in pond (low predation - high competition) vs. coastal marine (high predation - low competition) nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius) reared in a common garden experiment. Pond sticklebacks were more active feeders, more risk-taking, aggressive and explorative than marine sticklebacks. Perceived predation risk decreased aggression and risk-taking of all fish. Food restriction increased feeding activity and risk-taking. Pond sticklebacks became more risk-taking than marine sticklebacks under food shortage, whereas well-fed fish behaved similarly. Among poorly fed fish, males showed higher drive to feed, whereas among well-fed fish, females did. Apart from showing how evolutionary history, ontogenetic experience and sex influence behaviour, the results provide evidence for habitat-dependent expression of adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

AB - Geographical variation in behaviour within species is common. However, how behavioural plasticity varies between and within locally adapted populations is less studied. Here, we studied behavioural plasticity induced by perceived predation risk and food availability in pond (low predation - high competition) vs. coastal marine (high predation - low competition) nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius) reared in a common garden experiment. Pond sticklebacks were more active feeders, more risk-taking, aggressive and explorative than marine sticklebacks. Perceived predation risk decreased aggression and risk-taking of all fish. Food restriction increased feeding activity and risk-taking. Pond sticklebacks became more risk-taking than marine sticklebacks under food shortage, whereas well-fed fish behaved similarly. Among poorly fed fish, males showed higher drive to feed, whereas among well-fed fish, females did. Apart from showing how evolutionary history, ontogenetic experience and sex influence behaviour, the results provide evidence for habitat-dependent expression of adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

KW - Behavioural evolution

KW - Behavioural plasticity

KW - Competition

KW - Local adaptation

KW - Phenotypic plasticity

KW - Predation

KW - Pungitius

KW - Stickleback

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80053940391&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80053940391&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2011.02371.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2011.02371.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 21883614

AN - SCOPUS:80053940391

VL - 24

SP - 2434

EP - 2444

JO - Journal of Evolutionary Biology

JF - Journal of Evolutionary Biology

SN - 1010-061X

IS - 11

ER -