Intracranial pressure waves generated by high-energy short laser pulses can cause morphological damage in remote areas: Comparison of the effects of 2.1-μm Ho:YAG and 1.06-μm Nd:YAG laser irradiations in the rat brain

A. Czurko, Z. Toth, T. Doczi, F. Gallyas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objective: Histological effects of 2.1-μm Ho:YAG and 1.06-μm Nd:YAG laser pulses were compared in the I rat brain, with special regard to areas remote from the irradiated site. Study Design/Materials and Methods: Laser pulses were delivered through a 0.6-mm glass fiber, the tip of which was either introduced into the caudate nucleus (application mode I), or held at a 2-mm distance above the exposed intact dura. In the latter case, the space between the dura and the fiber tip was filled either with physiological saline (application mode II) or air with (application mode III). Results: In application modes I and II, but not in application mode HI, Ho:YAG laser pulses of 1.5 J and 200 ms, but not Nd:YAG laser pulses with the same parameters, immediately caused morphological damage to a considerable number of neurons and axons randomly distributed among apparently normal ones in certain areas remote from the irradiated site. A decrease in the energy and an increase in the length of the pulses lowered the incidence of the remote morphological damage. Conclusion: This novel finding may impose limits on the application of Ho:YAG lasers in human endoscopic neurosurgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)444-455
Number of pages12
JournalLasers in Surgery and Medicine
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 20 1997

Keywords

  • Axonal damage
  • Blood-brain barrier damage
  • Endoscopic neurosurgery
  • Light microscopy
  • Neuronal damage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

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