Interplay between the Mediterranean diet and C-reactive protein genetic polymorphisms towards inflammation in adolescents

the HELENA study group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: From a nutrigenetics perspective, we aim to investigate the moderating role of the Mediterranean diet and each of its subgroups in the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) gene polymorphisms and CRP blood concentration in adolescents. Methods: In 562 adolescents (13–17 y) of the European HELENA study, data was available on circulating CRP levels as inflammatory biomarker, three CRP gene SNPs (rs3093068, rs1204, rs1130864), food intake determined by a self-administered computerized 24 h-dietary recall for 2 days, and body composition. A 9-point Mediterranean diet score and each food subgroup were tested as moderator via SNP*diet interaction. Analyzes were adjusted for age, sex, puberty, adiposity and socioeconomic status. Results: The minor allele frequencies of rs3093068 and rs1130864 SNPs (GG and TT, respectively) were associated with higher CRP concentrations, while rs1205 (CT/TT) was associated with lower CRP concentrations. There were significant interactions between rs3093068 and Mediterranean diet (B = −0.1139, p = 0.011), or the fish food subgroup (B = −0.0090, p = 0.022), so that those with the highest genetic CRP risk underwent the highest CRP attenuation by a healthier diet. Although the effect of diet and SNP was substantial, the explained variance by interaction was only 1%. Conclusion: Greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet and particularly its fish component was associated with a lower CRP blood concentrations especially in those at highest genetic risk due to the rs3093068 SNP.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Nutrition
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Mediterranean Diet
Genetic Polymorphisms
C-Reactive Protein
Inflammation
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Fishes
Nutrigenomics
Diet
Food
Adiposity
Puberty
Body Composition
Gene Frequency
Social Class
Genes
Eating
Biomarkers

Keywords

  • C-reactive protein
  • Inflammation
  • Interaction
  • Mediterranean diet
  • Nutrigenomics
  • Single nucleotide polymorphism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Interplay between the Mediterranean diet and C-reactive protein genetic polymorphisms towards inflammation in adolescents. / the HELENA study group.

In: Clinical Nutrition, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Aim: From a nutrigenetics perspective, we aim to investigate the moderating role of the Mediterranean diet and each of its subgroups in the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) gene polymorphisms and CRP blood concentration in adolescents. Methods: In 562 adolescents (13–17 y) of the European HELENA study, data was available on circulating CRP levels as inflammatory biomarker, three CRP gene SNPs (rs3093068, rs1204, rs1130864), food intake determined by a self-administered computerized 24 h-dietary recall for 2 days, and body composition. A 9-point Mediterranean diet score and each food subgroup were tested as moderator via SNP*diet interaction. Analyzes were adjusted for age, sex, puberty, adiposity and socioeconomic status. Results: The minor allele frequencies of rs3093068 and rs1130864 SNPs (GG and TT, respectively) were associated with higher CRP concentrations, while rs1205 (CT/TT) was associated with lower CRP concentrations. There were significant interactions between rs3093068 and Mediterranean diet (B = −0.1139, p = 0.011), or the fish food subgroup (B = −0.0090, p = 0.022), so that those with the highest genetic CRP risk underwent the highest CRP attenuation by a healthier diet. Although the effect of diet and SNP was substantial, the explained variance by interaction was only 1{\%}. Conclusion: Greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet and particularly its fish component was associated with a lower CRP blood concentrations especially in those at highest genetic risk due to the rs3093068 SNP.",
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author = "{the HELENA study group} and Arouca, {Aline B.} and A. Meirhaeghe and Jean Dallongeville and Moreno, {Luis A.} and Louren{\cc}o, {Gustavo Jacob} and Ascensi{\'o}n Marcos and Inge Huybrechts and Yannis Manios and Lambrinou, {Christina Paulina} and Frederic Gottrand and Anthony Kafatos and Mathilde Kersting and Michael Sj{\"o}str{\"o}m and Kurt Widhalm and Marika Ferrari and D. Moln{\'a}r and Marcela Gonz{\'a}lez-Gross and M. Forsner and {De Henauw}, Stefaan and Nathalie Michels",
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AU - the HELENA study group

AU - Arouca, Aline B.

AU - Meirhaeghe, A.

AU - Dallongeville, Jean

AU - Moreno, Luis A.

AU - Lourenço, Gustavo Jacob

AU - Marcos, Ascensión

AU - Huybrechts, Inge

AU - Manios, Yannis

AU - Lambrinou, Christina Paulina

AU - Gottrand, Frederic

AU - Kafatos, Anthony

AU - Kersting, Mathilde

AU - Sjöström, Michael

AU - Widhalm, Kurt

AU - Ferrari, Marika

AU - Molnár, D.

AU - González-Gross, Marcela

AU - Forsner, M.

AU - De Henauw, Stefaan

AU - Michels, Nathalie

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N2 - Aim: From a nutrigenetics perspective, we aim to investigate the moderating role of the Mediterranean diet and each of its subgroups in the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) gene polymorphisms and CRP blood concentration in adolescents. Methods: In 562 adolescents (13–17 y) of the European HELENA study, data was available on circulating CRP levels as inflammatory biomarker, three CRP gene SNPs (rs3093068, rs1204, rs1130864), food intake determined by a self-administered computerized 24 h-dietary recall for 2 days, and body composition. A 9-point Mediterranean diet score and each food subgroup were tested as moderator via SNP*diet interaction. Analyzes were adjusted for age, sex, puberty, adiposity and socioeconomic status. Results: The minor allele frequencies of rs3093068 and rs1130864 SNPs (GG and TT, respectively) were associated with higher CRP concentrations, while rs1205 (CT/TT) was associated with lower CRP concentrations. There were significant interactions between rs3093068 and Mediterranean diet (B = −0.1139, p = 0.011), or the fish food subgroup (B = −0.0090, p = 0.022), so that those with the highest genetic CRP risk underwent the highest CRP attenuation by a healthier diet. Although the effect of diet and SNP was substantial, the explained variance by interaction was only 1%. Conclusion: Greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet and particularly its fish component was associated with a lower CRP blood concentrations especially in those at highest genetic risk due to the rs3093068 SNP.

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KW - Nutrigenomics

KW - Single nucleotide polymorphism

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