Interethnic differences of CYP2C9 alleles in healthy Hungarian and Roma population samples: Relationship to worldwide allelic frequencies

C. Sipeky, Lilla Lakner, Melinda Szabo, Istvan Takacs, V. Tamási, Noemi Polgar, A. Falus, B. Melegh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CYP2C9 gene polymorphisms are widely studied in several ethnic groups, however they are less known in the Roma population. The aim of this work was to study the ethnic differences of the CYP2C9 allele distribution in a healthy Roma population in order to compare them with a healthy Hungarian population. A total of 535 Hungarian and 465 Roma volunteers were genotyped for the CYP2C9*2 (Arg144Cys) and CYP2C9*3 (Ile359Leu) allelic variants by PCR-RFLP assay. The frequencies of the CYP2C9*1, *2 and *3 alleles in the Hungarian population were 0.787, 0.125, and 0.088 and in Roma 0.727, 0.118, and 0.155, respectively. We found a significant difference in CYP2C9*3 prevalence between the Hungarian and Roma populations, which have therapeutic consequences (p <0.005). The distribution of *1/*1, *1/*2, *1/*3, *2/*2, *2/*3, and *3/*3 genotypes in Hungarians were 0.620, 0.195, 0.139, 0.021, 0.015, and 0.011, while in Roma were 0.533, 0.168, 0.219, 0.011, 0.047, and 0.022, respectively. A significant difference was found between the Hungarian and Roma populations regarding the *1/*1, *1/*3 and the *2/*3 (p <0.005) genotypes. This is the first study to investigate the polymorphisms of CYP2C9 gene in the two largest populations in Hungary, healthy Hungarians and Roma. The prevalence of variant CYP2C9 alleles in the Hungarian population is similar to that observed in other European populations. In contrast, the Roma population differs from Hungarians, from most of other Caucasian groups, and from Indians in the incidence of CYP2C9 common variants. The difference in allele distribution patterns between the two populations studied has therapeutic implications as it influences the optimization of therapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-242
Number of pages4
JournalBlood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Roma
Alleles
Population
Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C9
Genotype
Hungary
Ethnic Groups
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Genes
Volunteers
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Anticoagulants
  • CYP2C9
  • Hungarian
  • Interethnic differences
  • Roma
  • Warfarin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Interethnic differences of CYP2C9 alleles in healthy Hungarian and Roma population samples : Relationship to worldwide allelic frequencies. / Sipeky, C.; Lakner, Lilla; Szabo, Melinda; Takacs, Istvan; Tamási, V.; Polgar, Noemi; Falus, A.; Melegh, B.

In: Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases, Vol. 43, No. 3, 11.2009, p. 239-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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