Interaction of Temperature and Light in the Development of Freezing Tolerance in Plants

T. Janda, Imre Majláth, G. Szalai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Freezing tolerance is the result of a wide range of physical and biochemical processes, such as the induction of antifreeze proteins, changes in membrane composition, the accumulation of osmoprotectants, and changes in the redox status, which allow plants to function at low temperatures. Even in frost-tolerant species, a certain period of growth at low but nonfreezing temperatures, known as frost or cold hardening, is required for the development of a high level of frost hardiness. It has long been known that frost hardening at low temperature under low light intensity is much less effective than under normal light conditions; it has also been shown that elevated light intensity at normal temperatures may partly replace the cold-hardening period. Earlier results indicated that cold acclimation reflects a response to a chloroplastic redox signal while the effects of excitation pressure extend beyond photosynthetic acclimation, influencing plant morphology and the expression of certain nuclear genes involved in cold acclimation. Recent results have shown that not only are parameters closely linked to the photosynthetic electron transport processes affected by light during hardening at low temperature, but light may also have an influence on the expression level of several other cold-related genes; several cold-acclimation processes can function efficiently only in the presence of light. The present review provides an overview of mechanisms that may explain how light improves the freezing tolerance of plants during the cold-hardening period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)460-469
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Plant Growth Regulation
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

cold tolerance
frost
acclimation
temperature
light intensity
osmotolerance
plant morphology
electron transfer
genes

Keywords

  • Chloroplast
  • Cold hardening
  • Excitation
  • Freezing
  • Frost tolerance
  • Photosynthesis
  • Plant hormones
  • Signalling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Interaction of Temperature and Light in the Development of Freezing Tolerance in Plants. / Janda, T.; Majláth, Imre; Szalai, G.

In: Journal of Plant Growth Regulation, Vol. 33, No. 2, 2014, p. 460-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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