Interaction between catecholaminergic terminals and urocortinergic neurons in the Edinger-Westphal nucleus in the rat

B. Gaszner, Tamás Kozicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Central stress regulatory pathways utilize various neurotransmitters/neuropeptides, such as urocortin (Ucn) and catecholamines. Ucn is most abundantly expressed in the Edinger-Westphal nucleus (E-WN), co-distributed with catecholaminergic terminals. Acute stress recruits E-WN neurons, and ascending catecholaminergic pathways also contribute to the activation of various brain areas in response to stress. We hypothesized that catecholamine and Ucn interactions in the E-WN mediated the recruitment of these neurons in response to stress. Using double-labeling immunohistochemistry, we found close appositions between urocortin-immunoreactive nervous structures and dopaminergic terminals, however, depletion of them had no effect on the activation pattern of E-WN neurons upon acute immune challenge. From these results we conclude that dopaminergic terminals innervating E-WN Ucn neurons do not play a major role in mediating the responses of E-WN neurons upon acute immune challenge.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-121
Number of pages5
JournalBrain Research
Volume989
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Urocortins
Neurons
Catecholamines
Neuropeptides
Neurotransmitter Agents
Edinger-Westphal Nucleus
Immunohistochemistry
Brain

Keywords

  • 6-Hydroxy-dopamine treatment
  • Catecholamine
  • Dopamine-beta-hydroxylase immunoreactivity
  • Lipopolysaccharide stress
  • Thyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Interaction between catecholaminergic terminals and urocortinergic neurons in the Edinger-Westphal nucleus in the rat. / Gaszner, B.; Kozicz, Tamás.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 989, No. 1, 2003, p. 117-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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