Insulin resistance occurs in parallel with sensory neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats: Differential response to early vs late insulin supplementation

Z. Szilvássy, J. Németh, Péter Kovács, G. Paragh, Réka Sári, L. Vígh, Barna Peitl

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Abstract

We investigated whether progressive sensory neuropathy was accompanied by changes in whole-body insulin sensitivity (WBIS) in rats made diabetic by streptozotocin (STZ). The effects of early and late insulin supplementation were also studied. The STZ-treated rats failed to gain weight and exhibited stable hyperglycemia and low plasma insulin levels with a decrease in nerve conduction velocity (NCV) measured in A and C fibers of the saphenous nerve. A decreased sensory neuropeptide (SNP) release such as that of substance P, somatostatin, and calcitonin gene-related peptide determined from organ fluid of tracheal preparations subjected to electrical field stimulation also occurred in diabetic animals. These features were accompanied by a decrease in WBIS measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamping and a decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in cardiac and gastrocnemius muscle. When insulin supplementation with slow-release implants (2 IU/d) was started 4 weeks after STZ injection, blood glucose level normalized. Both insulin sensitivity and sensory nerve function reflected in either NCV or SNP release completely recovered by the 12th post-STZ week. When the insulin implants were applied from the eighth post-STZ week, both WBIS and glucose uptake remained significantly decreased, with a seriously impaired NCV and SNP release with strong hyperglycemia. Late insulin supplementation, however, even by using double implantation from the 10th post-STZ week, was unable to restore blood glucose, WBIS, NCV, and SNP release by the 12th week. Insulin resistance occurs in parallel with sensory neuropathy in STZ-diabetic rats. Both can be improved by early but not late insulin supplementation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)776-786
Number of pages11
JournalMetabolism: Clinical and Experimental
Volume61
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Experimental Diabetes Mellitus
Streptozocin
Insulin Resistance
Insulin
Neural Conduction
Neuropeptides
Glucose Clamp Technique
Hyperglycemia
Blood Glucose
Myelinated Nerve Fibers
Glucose
Unmyelinated Nerve Fibers
Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide
Substance P
Somatostatin
Electric Stimulation
Weight Gain
Myocardium
Skeletal Muscle
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

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abstract = "We investigated whether progressive sensory neuropathy was accompanied by changes in whole-body insulin sensitivity (WBIS) in rats made diabetic by streptozotocin (STZ). The effects of early and late insulin supplementation were also studied. The STZ-treated rats failed to gain weight and exhibited stable hyperglycemia and low plasma insulin levels with a decrease in nerve conduction velocity (NCV) measured in A and C fibers of the saphenous nerve. A decreased sensory neuropeptide (SNP) release such as that of substance P, somatostatin, and calcitonin gene-related peptide determined from organ fluid of tracheal preparations subjected to electrical field stimulation also occurred in diabetic animals. These features were accompanied by a decrease in WBIS measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamping and a decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in cardiac and gastrocnemius muscle. When insulin supplementation with slow-release implants (2 IU/d) was started 4 weeks after STZ injection, blood glucose level normalized. Both insulin sensitivity and sensory nerve function reflected in either NCV or SNP release completely recovered by the 12th post-STZ week. When the insulin implants were applied from the eighth post-STZ week, both WBIS and glucose uptake remained significantly decreased, with a seriously impaired NCV and SNP release with strong hyperglycemia. Late insulin supplementation, however, even by using double implantation from the 10th post-STZ week, was unable to restore blood glucose, WBIS, NCV, and SNP release by the 12th week. Insulin resistance occurs in parallel with sensory neuropathy in STZ-diabetic rats. Both can be improved by early but not late insulin supplementation.",
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T2 - Differential response to early vs late insulin supplementation

AU - Szilvássy, Z.

AU - Németh, J.

AU - Kovács, Péter

AU - Paragh, G.

AU - Sári, Réka

AU - Vígh, L.

AU - Peitl, Barna

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N2 - We investigated whether progressive sensory neuropathy was accompanied by changes in whole-body insulin sensitivity (WBIS) in rats made diabetic by streptozotocin (STZ). The effects of early and late insulin supplementation were also studied. The STZ-treated rats failed to gain weight and exhibited stable hyperglycemia and low plasma insulin levels with a decrease in nerve conduction velocity (NCV) measured in A and C fibers of the saphenous nerve. A decreased sensory neuropeptide (SNP) release such as that of substance P, somatostatin, and calcitonin gene-related peptide determined from organ fluid of tracheal preparations subjected to electrical field stimulation also occurred in diabetic animals. These features were accompanied by a decrease in WBIS measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamping and a decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in cardiac and gastrocnemius muscle. When insulin supplementation with slow-release implants (2 IU/d) was started 4 weeks after STZ injection, blood glucose level normalized. Both insulin sensitivity and sensory nerve function reflected in either NCV or SNP release completely recovered by the 12th post-STZ week. When the insulin implants were applied from the eighth post-STZ week, both WBIS and glucose uptake remained significantly decreased, with a seriously impaired NCV and SNP release with strong hyperglycemia. Late insulin supplementation, however, even by using double implantation from the 10th post-STZ week, was unable to restore blood glucose, WBIS, NCV, and SNP release by the 12th week. Insulin resistance occurs in parallel with sensory neuropathy in STZ-diabetic rats. Both can be improved by early but not late insulin supplementation.

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