Inorganic salts direct the assembly of charged nanoparticles into composite nanoscopic spheres, plates, or needles

Bartosz A. Grzybowski, Bartlomiej Kowalczyk, I. Lagzi, Dawei Wang, Konstantin V. Tretiakov, David A. Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oppositely charged, nanoionic nanoparticles can act as "universal surfactants" regulating the growth of ionic microcrystals. This phenomenon derives from a subtle interplay between crystal growth and cooperative electrostatic adsorption of the nanoparticles onto crystal faces. In addition to the electrostatic interactions acting in the system, the nature of salts is also important in the sense that for the same Debye screening length, different salts can mediate formation of markedly different assemblies including supraspheres, nanoneedles, or nanoplates. The method can be further extended to coat non-ionic crystals with appropriately functionalized nanoparticles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-209
Number of pages9
JournalFaraday Discussions
Volume159
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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needles
Needles
Salts
assembly
Nanoparticles
salts
nanoparticles
composite materials
Composite materials
Nanoneedles
electrostatics
Crystals
Microcrystals
microcrystals
Crystallization
Coulomb interactions
Surface-Active Agents
assemblies
crystals
crystal growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Inorganic salts direct the assembly of charged nanoparticles into composite nanoscopic spheres, plates, or needles. / Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Lagzi, I.; Wang, Dawei; Tretiakov, Konstantin V.; Walker, David A.

In: Faraday Discussions, Vol. 159, 2012, p. 201-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grzybowski, Bartosz A. ; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej ; Lagzi, I. ; Wang, Dawei ; Tretiakov, Konstantin V. ; Walker, David A. / Inorganic salts direct the assembly of charged nanoparticles into composite nanoscopic spheres, plates, or needles. In: Faraday Discussions. 2012 ; Vol. 159. pp. 201-209.
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