Innervation extrakranialer Gewebe durch Kollateralen von Hirnhautafferenzen

Neue Einsichten in die Entstehung und Therapie von Kopfschmerzen

Translated title of the contribution: Innervation of extracranial tissues through collaterals of meningeal afferents: New insights into the generation and therapy of headaches

K. Meßlinger, M. Schüler, M. Dux, W. L. Neuhuber, R. de Col

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Headaches are believed to arise from the cranial dura mater and large cerebral arteries because stimuli applied to these structures cause exclusively headache-like sensations. The contribution of extracranial structures like head and neck muscles with their trigger points has also been discussed. The convergence of afferent input to the trigemino-cervical brainstem complex is mainly regarded as an explanation for the influence of extracranial nociceptive events on the headache generation. New structural and functional examinations, particularly tracing experiments in rodent and human tissues, show clearly that collaterals of meningeal nerve fibres penetrate the skull through sutures and along blood vessels to innervate parts of the outer periosteum and deep layers of pericranial muscles. Upon noxious stimulation of these extracranial structures the excitation spreads along these afferent branches into the meninges causing neuropeptide release and increased meningeal blood flow. The concept of an extracranial innervation by meningeal afferent collaterals offers a new explanation for the role of pericranial tissues in headache generation and the beneficial effects of therapeutic manipulations on these structures.

Original languageGerman
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalManuelle Medizin
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jul 15 2016

Fingerprint

Headache
Trigger Points
Neck Muscles
Cohort Effect
Meninges
Dura Mater
Periosteum
Cerebral Arteries
Therapeutics
Neuropeptides
Nerve Fibers
Skull
Sutures
Brain Stem
Blood Vessels
Rodentia
Head
Muscles

Keywords

  • Blood flow
  • Cranial dura
  • Head muscles
  • Tension-type headache
  • Trigeminal nerve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Complementary and Manual Therapy

Cite this

Innervation extrakranialer Gewebe durch Kollateralen von Hirnhautafferenzen : Neue Einsichten in die Entstehung und Therapie von Kopfschmerzen. / Meßlinger, K.; Schüler, M.; Dux, M.; Neuhuber, W. L.; de Col, R.

In: Manuelle Medizin, 15.07.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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