Innate immune cell networking in hepatitis C virus infection

Banishree Saha, G. Szabó

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Persistent viral infection, such as HCV infection, is the result of the inability of the host immune system to mount a successful antiviral response, as well as the escape strategies devised by the virus. Although each individual component of the host immune system plays important roles in antiviral immunity, the interactive network of immune cells as a whole acts against the virus. The innate immune system forms the first line of host defense against viral infection, and thus, virus elimination or chronic HCV infection is linked to the direct outcome of the interactions between the various innate immune cells and HCV. By understanding how the distinct components of the innate immune system function both individually and collectively during HCV infection, potential therapeutic targets can be identified to overcome immune dysfunction and control chronic viral infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-766
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Leukocyte Biology
Volume96
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2014

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Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
Immune System
Viruses
Antiviral Agents
Infection
Immunity
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Chronic
  • Dendritic cells
  • Macrophages
  • Monocytes
  • NK cells
  • Sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Innate immune cell networking in hepatitis C virus infection. / Saha, Banishree; Szabó, G.

In: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, Vol. 96, No. 5, 01.11.2014, p. 757-766.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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