Influence of phosphate fertilizer sources and soil properties on trace element concentrations of red clover

E. Osztoics, P. Csathó, T. Németh, Gy Baczó, M. Magyar, L. Radimszky, A. Osztoics

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Depending on their origin, superphosphates and rock phosphates may contain different quantities of heavy metals and other potentially toxic elements or compounds. The effects of various rates of single superphosphate (produced from Russian magmatic Kola rock phosphate) and ground, reactive, sedimentary Algerian rock phosphate on soil pH, the "available" (AAAc-EDTA-soluble) trace element concentrations in the soil and in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) were studied in a pot experiment on several acidic soils originating from the Carpathian Basin. The experiment included similar rates (50, 100, and 400 mg P2O5 kg-1) of each P form. In addition, extra high rock phosphate rates were also applied. At increasing P application rates, the soil pH decreased when superphosphate was added but increased when the P was applied in the form of rock phosphate. Differences in soil properties (original pH, soil texture, trace element content, etc.) were reflected in the Cd, Cr, Sr, and Mn concentrations of red clover, as were differences in soil pH caused by different P forms or rates. The trace element concentrations in plants were lower on slightly acidic than on strongly acidic soils. Element contents were generally higher when the red clover was cut at a "younger" growth stage (i.e., when there was less time between two cuts and decreased in later cuts. On some, soils a significant correlation was found between the AAAc-EDTA-soluble Cd, Cr, Sr, and Al contents and those in plant tissues.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)557-570
Number of pages14
JournalCommunications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Volume36
Issue number4-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Phosphate fertilizers
rock phosphate
phosphorus fertilizers
Trace Elements
Trifolium pratense
trace elements
soil properties
soil property
phosphate
fertilizer
trace element
phosphate rock
Soils
soil pH
superphosphate
Phosphates
soil
acid soils
Rocks
superphosphates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science
  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Influence of phosphate fertilizer sources and soil properties on trace element concentrations of red clover. / Osztoics, E.; Csathó, P.; Németh, T.; Baczó, Gy; Magyar, M.; Radimszky, L.; Osztoics, A.

In: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, Vol. 36, No. 4-6, 2005, p. 557-570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Osztoics, E. ; Csathó, P. ; Németh, T. ; Baczó, Gy ; Magyar, M. ; Radimszky, L. ; Osztoics, A. / Influence of phosphate fertilizer sources and soil properties on trace element concentrations of red clover. In: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis. 2005 ; Vol. 36, No. 4-6. pp. 557-570.
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