Influence of alanylglutamine infusion on gastrointestinal glutamine and alanine metabolism in anesthetized dogs

J. Karner, Erich Roth

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we administered an infusion of alanylglutamine (10 μmol/kg · min) for 60 minutes to postoperative anaesthetized dogs with catheters placed in the portal and hepatic veins. Arterial plasma levels of alanylglutamine were 83 ± 27 μmol/L 20 minutes after the onset of the infusion and remained constant throughout the infusion period. Plasma levels of glutamine and alanine approximately doubled compared with preinfusion levels, indicating a release of these amino acids from the dipeptide. The halflife of alanylglutamine, calculated after bolus injection of 2 g, was 1.7 ± 0.5 minutes. Alanylglutamine was extracted from the liver and the gut (0.9 ± 0.3 and 0.5 ± 0.1 μmol/kg · min, respectively). In the basal period (without infusion of alanylglutamine), a glutamine uptake by the liver and the intestine was found. Alanine was taken up by the liver and released from the gut. The infusion of alanylglutamine significantly increased the hepatic uptake of glutamine and alanine (from 0.8 ± 0.2 to 3.8 ± 0.6 and from 3.0 ± 0.4 to 7.5 ± 0.7 μmol/kg · min respectively; P <.01) and did not significantly change the intestinal uptake of glutamine and the release of alanine. We conclude that the infusion of alanylglutamine markedly influences the hepatic metabolism of glutamine and alanine, probably via the increased arterial and portal levels of glutamine and alanine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-77
Number of pages5
JournalMetabolism: Clinical and Experimental
Volume38
Issue number8 SUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1989

Fingerprint

alanylglutamine
Glutamine
Alanine
Dogs
Liver
Hepatic Veins
Dipeptides
Portal Vein
Intestines
Half-Life
Catheters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Influence of alanylglutamine infusion on gastrointestinal glutamine and alanine metabolism in anesthetized dogs. / Karner, J.; Roth, Erich.

In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, Vol. 38, No. 8 SUPPL. 1, 1989, p. 73-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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