Induction of HIV-1 replication in latently infected syncytiotrophoblast cells by contact with placental macrophages: Role of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α

Attila Bácsi, Eszter Csoma, Zoltán Beck, István Andirkó, József Kónya, L. Gergely, F. Tóth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The syncytiotrophoblast (ST) layer of the human placenta has an important role in limiting transplacental viral spread from mother to fetus. Although certain strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) may enter ST cells, the trophoblast does not exhibit permissiveness for HIV-1. The present study tested the possibility that placental macrophages might induce replication of HIV-1 carried in ST cells and, further, that infected ST cells would be capable of transmitting virus into neighboring macrophages. For this purpose, we investigated HIV-1 replication in ST cells grown alone or cocultured with uninfected placental macrophages. The macrophage-tropic Ba-L strain of HIV-1, capable of entering ST cells, was used throughout our studies. We demonstrated that interactions between ST cells and macrophages activated HIV-1 from latency and induced its replication in ST cells. After having become permissive for viral replication, ST cells delivered HIV-1 to the cocultured macrophages, as evidenced by detection of virus-specific antigens in these cells. The stimulatory effect of coculture on HIV-1 gene expression in ST cells was mediated by marked tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) release from macrophages, an effect caused by contact between the different placental cells. Results of this study suggest an interactive role for the ST layer and placental macrophages in the dissemination of HIV-1 among placental tissue. Data reported here may also explain why macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains are transmitted preferentially during pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1079-1088
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Interferon and Cytokine Research
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Trophoblasts
Virus Replication
HIV-1
Interleukin-6
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Macrophages
Permissiveness
Virus Latency
Viruses
Coculture Techniques
Placenta
Fetus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Induction of HIV-1 replication in latently infected syncytiotrophoblast cells by contact with placental macrophages : Role of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. / Bácsi, Attila; Csoma, Eszter; Beck, Zoltán; Andirkó, István; Kónya, József; Gergely, L.; Tóth, F.

In: Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research, Vol. 21, No. 12, 2001, p. 1079-1088.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e13e998e667d40f1bdafbfb0d2da54ee,
title = "Induction of HIV-1 replication in latently infected syncytiotrophoblast cells by contact with placental macrophages: Role of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α",
abstract = "The syncytiotrophoblast (ST) layer of the human placenta has an important role in limiting transplacental viral spread from mother to fetus. Although certain strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) may enter ST cells, the trophoblast does not exhibit permissiveness for HIV-1. The present study tested the possibility that placental macrophages might induce replication of HIV-1 carried in ST cells and, further, that infected ST cells would be capable of transmitting virus into neighboring macrophages. For this purpose, we investigated HIV-1 replication in ST cells grown alone or cocultured with uninfected placental macrophages. The macrophage-tropic Ba-L strain of HIV-1, capable of entering ST cells, was used throughout our studies. We demonstrated that interactions between ST cells and macrophages activated HIV-1 from latency and induced its replication in ST cells. After having become permissive for viral replication, ST cells delivered HIV-1 to the cocultured macrophages, as evidenced by detection of virus-specific antigens in these cells. The stimulatory effect of coculture on HIV-1 gene expression in ST cells was mediated by marked tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) release from macrophages, an effect caused by contact between the different placental cells. Results of this study suggest an interactive role for the ST layer and placental macrophages in the dissemination of HIV-1 among placental tissue. Data reported here may also explain why macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains are transmitted preferentially during pregnancy.",
author = "Attila B{\'a}csi and Eszter Csoma and Zolt{\'a}n Beck and Istv{\'a}n Andirk{\'o} and J{\'o}zsef K{\'o}nya and L. Gergely and F. T{\'o}th",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1089/107999001317205213",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "1079--1088",
journal = "Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research",
issn = "1079-9907",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Induction of HIV-1 replication in latently infected syncytiotrophoblast cells by contact with placental macrophages

T2 - Role of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α

AU - Bácsi, Attila

AU - Csoma, Eszter

AU - Beck, Zoltán

AU - Andirkó, István

AU - Kónya, József

AU - Gergely, L.

AU - Tóth, F.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - The syncytiotrophoblast (ST) layer of the human placenta has an important role in limiting transplacental viral spread from mother to fetus. Although certain strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) may enter ST cells, the trophoblast does not exhibit permissiveness for HIV-1. The present study tested the possibility that placental macrophages might induce replication of HIV-1 carried in ST cells and, further, that infected ST cells would be capable of transmitting virus into neighboring macrophages. For this purpose, we investigated HIV-1 replication in ST cells grown alone or cocultured with uninfected placental macrophages. The macrophage-tropic Ba-L strain of HIV-1, capable of entering ST cells, was used throughout our studies. We demonstrated that interactions between ST cells and macrophages activated HIV-1 from latency and induced its replication in ST cells. After having become permissive for viral replication, ST cells delivered HIV-1 to the cocultured macrophages, as evidenced by detection of virus-specific antigens in these cells. The stimulatory effect of coculture on HIV-1 gene expression in ST cells was mediated by marked tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) release from macrophages, an effect caused by contact between the different placental cells. Results of this study suggest an interactive role for the ST layer and placental macrophages in the dissemination of HIV-1 among placental tissue. Data reported here may also explain why macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains are transmitted preferentially during pregnancy.

AB - The syncytiotrophoblast (ST) layer of the human placenta has an important role in limiting transplacental viral spread from mother to fetus. Although certain strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) may enter ST cells, the trophoblast does not exhibit permissiveness for HIV-1. The present study tested the possibility that placental macrophages might induce replication of HIV-1 carried in ST cells and, further, that infected ST cells would be capable of transmitting virus into neighboring macrophages. For this purpose, we investigated HIV-1 replication in ST cells grown alone or cocultured with uninfected placental macrophages. The macrophage-tropic Ba-L strain of HIV-1, capable of entering ST cells, was used throughout our studies. We demonstrated that interactions between ST cells and macrophages activated HIV-1 from latency and induced its replication in ST cells. After having become permissive for viral replication, ST cells delivered HIV-1 to the cocultured macrophages, as evidenced by detection of virus-specific antigens in these cells. The stimulatory effect of coculture on HIV-1 gene expression in ST cells was mediated by marked tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) release from macrophages, an effect caused by contact between the different placental cells. Results of this study suggest an interactive role for the ST layer and placental macrophages in the dissemination of HIV-1 among placental tissue. Data reported here may also explain why macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains are transmitted preferentially during pregnancy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035704317&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035704317&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/107999001317205213

DO - 10.1089/107999001317205213

M3 - Article

C2 - 11798466

AN - SCOPUS:0035704317

VL - 21

SP - 1079

EP - 1088

JO - Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research

JF - Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research

SN - 1079-9907

IS - 12

ER -