Indoor air pollution from solid fuels and risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancers in Central and Eastern Europe

A. Sapkota, D. Zaridze, N. Szeszenia-Dabrowska, D. Mates, E. Fabiánová, P. Rudnai, V. Janout, I. Holcatova, P. Brennan, P. Boffetta, M. Hashibe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Indoor air pollution from solid fuels is a potentially important risk factor for cancer, yet data on cancers from organs other than the lung are scarce. We investigated if indoor air pollution from coal and wood are risk factors for additional cancers, particularly that of the upper aerodigestive tract (oral cavity, larynx, pharynx and esophagus) in the high-risk areas of Central and Eastern Europe. Methods: We used data from multi-center hospital-based case-control study of 1065 histologically confirmed upper aerodigestive tract cancer cases and 1346 controls. Standardized questionnaires were used to collect information on residential fuel use for cooking and heating. Using unconditional logistic regression, we calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for upper aerodigestive tract cancer risk after adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Lifelong wood use was associated with pharyngeal and esophageal (OR 4.05, 95% CI: 1.30-12.68 and OR 2.71, 95% CI: 1.21-6.10, respectively). We observed an exposure-response relationship between duration of wood use and risk of pharyngeal cancer among those who had never used coal (Ptrend=0.04), ruling out the possibility of residual confounding by coal. Similarly, we observed an increased risk of laryngeal cancers and head & neck cancers among those who always used coal, with a noted exposure-response relationship (Ptrend

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-95
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume120
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Indoor air pollution
Indoor Air Pollution
Eastern Europe
Coal
cancer
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Neoplasms
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Wood
confidence interval
coal
Pharyngeal Neoplasms
risk factor
Laryngeal Neoplasms
Cooking
Larynx
Pharynx
Heating
Esophagus

Keywords

  • Agricultural waste
  • Cancer
  • Coal
  • Dung
  • Indoor air pollution
  • Wood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Indoor air pollution from solid fuels and risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancers in Central and Eastern Europe. / Sapkota, A.; Zaridze, D.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Mates, D.; Fabiánová, E.; Rudnai, P.; Janout, V.; Holcatova, I.; Brennan, P.; Boffetta, P.; Hashibe, M.

In: Environmental Research, Vol. 120, 01.2013, p. 90-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sapkota, A, Zaridze, D, Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N, Mates, D, Fabiánová, E, Rudnai, P, Janout, V, Holcatova, I, Brennan, P, Boffetta, P & Hashibe, M 2013, 'Indoor air pollution from solid fuels and risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancers in Central and Eastern Europe', Environmental Research, vol. 120, pp. 90-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2012.09.008
Sapkota, A. ; Zaridze, D. ; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N. ; Mates, D. ; Fabiánová, E. ; Rudnai, P. ; Janout, V. ; Holcatova, I. ; Brennan, P. ; Boffetta, P. ; Hashibe, M. / Indoor air pollution from solid fuels and risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancers in Central and Eastern Europe. In: Environmental Research. 2013 ; Vol. 120. pp. 90-95.
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AB - Background: Indoor air pollution from solid fuels is a potentially important risk factor for cancer, yet data on cancers from organs other than the lung are scarce. We investigated if indoor air pollution from coal and wood are risk factors for additional cancers, particularly that of the upper aerodigestive tract (oral cavity, larynx, pharynx and esophagus) in the high-risk areas of Central and Eastern Europe. Methods: We used data from multi-center hospital-based case-control study of 1065 histologically confirmed upper aerodigestive tract cancer cases and 1346 controls. Standardized questionnaires were used to collect information on residential fuel use for cooking and heating. Using unconditional logistic regression, we calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for upper aerodigestive tract cancer risk after adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Lifelong wood use was associated with pharyngeal and esophageal (OR 4.05, 95% CI: 1.30-12.68 and OR 2.71, 95% CI: 1.21-6.10, respectively). We observed an exposure-response relationship between duration of wood use and risk of pharyngeal cancer among those who had never used coal (Ptrend=0.04), ruling out the possibility of residual confounding by coal. Similarly, we observed an increased risk of laryngeal cancers and head & neck cancers among those who always used coal, with a noted exposure-response relationship (Ptrend

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