Indoor Air Pollutants and Immune Biomarkers among Hungarian Asthmatic Children

Esther Erdei, János Bobvos, Márta Brózik, A. Páldy, Ildikó Farkas, Éva Vaskövi, P. Rudnai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined the relationship between immune biomarkers and indoor air pollution cross-sectionally in school children 9-11 yr of age who had immunologically related respiratory diseases and who resided in Hungarian cities. Nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, benzene, xylene, and toluene were measured passively indoors prior to the collection of venous blood samples for blood counts and identification of immune biomarkers. House dust mite allergen was also measured. Numerous immune biomarkers were significantly elevated in these sensitive children, compared with normal children, and several biomarker alterations in these children were related to high concentrations of air pollutants in the home. The strongest and most significant associations were seen between high indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations and increased white blood cells, monocytes, red blood cells, and immunoglobulin G (IgG), as well as decreased immunoglobulin M (IgM) and Klebsiella pneumoniae-specific IgM. Bacterial-specific IgGs were related significantly to formaldehyde concentrations. These findings suggest the important role of indoor air pollutants in immune reactions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-347
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Environmental Health
Volume58
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2003

Fingerprint

Air Pollutants
Biomarkers
indoor air
biomarker
Blood
blood
Nitrogen Dioxide
nitrogen dioxide
formaldehyde
Formaldehyde
Immunoglobulin M
Indoor air pollution
Cells
Antigen-antibody reactions
Dermatophagoides Antigens
Indoor Air Pollution
Xylenes
Pulmonary diseases
pneumonia
respiratory disease

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Children
  • Immune biomarkers
  • Indoor air pollution
  • Respiratory disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Indoor Air Pollutants and Immune Biomarkers among Hungarian Asthmatic Children. / Erdei, Esther; Bobvos, János; Brózik, Márta; Páldy, A.; Farkas, Ildikó; Vaskövi, Éva; Rudnai, P.

In: Archives of Environmental Health, Vol. 58, No. 6, 06.2003, p. 337-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Erdei, E, Bobvos, J, Brózik, M, Páldy, A, Farkas, I, Vaskövi, É & Rudnai, P 2003, 'Indoor Air Pollutants and Immune Biomarkers among Hungarian Asthmatic Children', Archives of Environmental Health, vol. 58, no. 6, pp. 337-347.
Erdei E, Bobvos J, Brózik M, Páldy A, Farkas I, Vaskövi É et al. Indoor Air Pollutants and Immune Biomarkers among Hungarian Asthmatic Children. Archives of Environmental Health. 2003 Jun;58(6):337-347.
Erdei, Esther ; Bobvos, János ; Brózik, Márta ; Páldy, A. ; Farkas, Ildikó ; Vaskövi, Éva ; Rudnai, P. / Indoor Air Pollutants and Immune Biomarkers among Hungarian Asthmatic Children. In: Archives of Environmental Health. 2003 ; Vol. 58, No. 6. pp. 337-347.
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