Individual test point fluctuations of macular sensitivity in healthy eyes and eyes with age-related macular degeneration measured with microperimetry

Mirella Telles Salgueiro Barboni, Zsuzsanna Szepessy, Dora Fix Ventura, J. Németh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To establish fluctuation limits, it was considered that not only overall macular sensitivity but also fluctuations of individual test points in the macula might have clinical value. Methods: Three repeated measurements of microperimetry were performed using the Standard Expert test of Macular Integrity Assessment (MAIA) in healthy subjects (N = 12, age = 23.8 ± 1.5 years old) and in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (N = 11, age = 68.5 ± 7.4 years old). A total of 37 macular points arranged in four concentric rings and in four quadrants were analyzed individually and in groups. Results: The data show low fluctuation of macular sensitivity of individual test points in healthy subjects (average = 1.38 ± 0.28 dB) and AMD patients (average = 2.12 ± 0.60 dB). Lower sensitivity points are more related to higher fluctuation than to the distance from the central point. Fixation stability showed no effect on the sensitivity fluctuation. The 95th percentile of the standard deviations of healthy subjects was, on average, 2.7 dB, ranging from 1.2 to 4 dB, depending on the point tested. Conclusion: Point analysis and regional analysis might be considered prior to evaluating macular sensitivity fluctuation in order to distinguish between normal variation and a clinical change. Translational Relevance: Statistical methods were used to compare repeated microperimetry measurements and to establish fluctuation limits of the macular sensitivity. This analysis could add information regarding the integrity of different macular areas and provide new insights into fixation points prior to the biofeedback fixation training.

Original languageEnglish
Article number25
JournalTranslational Vision Science and Technology
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2018

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Macular Degeneration
Healthy Volunteers
Biofeedback
Statistical methods
Macular Degeneration, Age-Related, 11

Keywords

  • Age-related macular degeneration
  • Macular sensitivity
  • Microperimetry
  • Retina
  • Sensitivity fluctuation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Individual test point fluctuations of macular sensitivity in healthy eyes and eyes with age-related macular degeneration measured with microperimetry. / Barboni, Mirella Telles Salgueiro; Szepessy, Zsuzsanna; Ventura, Dora Fix; Németh, J.

In: Translational Vision Science and Technology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 25, 01.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Németh, J.

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