A kapillaritás-elmélet individuális fizikai mennyiségei - Új eljárás a határfelületi kölcsönhatások kiértékelésében

Translated title of the contribution: Individual physical quantities of capillary theory - A novel method to evaluate interfacial interactions

István Pászli, K. László

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The collective representation of the classical capillarity relations can also be expressed by individual variables corresponding to the individual contributions of the interacting phases, based on the dimensional analysis and the law of similarity. The collective and the individual representation describe the same state of the system, but with variables of different meaning and number. The state of the surface layers in a heterogeneous system is, by definition, not independent of their own properties. The equations used only state that these values can also be expressed by the individual fundamental quantities of the bulk phases. However, it is possible only if the structure is physically similar and if the physico-chemical properties of adjoining phases affect only the geometrical size of the layer. The advantage of the individual representation is that all the quantities, unlike the collective ones, can be directly derived from measured data, at least in one way. If a phase of given properties participates in several equilibrium states, its parameter is perforce identical, and its value can therefore be determined by studying any of the corresponding systems. The surface tension γφψ of the layer sφψ can be defined according to the extremum behaviour of the elastic potential (Eq. 3). The effective thickness of the whole layer, τφψeff is the sum of the half layer thicknesses. According to the Wallot-formula (Eq.6), the derived physical quantity, X, which is always positive, can be expressed as a power law function of the fundamental quantities of the independent partial interactions, x i. The tension parameters determining the surface tension in an equilibrium ternary liquid system can be derived from the data of the three liquids by Eq. 8. The tension parameters of a solid phase can be calculated from Young's equation (Eq. 9). Table 1 contains parameters calculated according to Eqs 8-9. The parameters can be determined at least in one way. Thus, the data of a phase in any state of matter is theoretically available. Owing to the availability of the parameters, the algebraic uncertainty experienced in the individual representation (e.g. in Young's equation) can be eliminated. Thus, when this approach is applied, the surface tension of the solid surface can be determined easily. The individual representation can be applied in crystallography as well (Table 2).

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)76-80
Number of pages5
JournalMagyar Kemiai Folyoirat, Kemiai Kozlemenyek
Volume109-110
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

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Surface tension
Crystallography
Capillarity
Liquids
Chemical properties
Availability
Uncertainty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

@article{52686866b4d848a8ba8debc59169a803,
title = "A kapillarit{\'a}s-elm{\'e}let individu{\'a}lis fizikai mennyis{\'e}gei - {\'U}j elj{\'a}r{\'a}s a hat{\'a}rfel{\"u}leti k{\"o}lcs{\"o}nhat{\'a}sok ki{\'e}rt{\'e}kel{\'e}s{\'e}ben",
abstract = "The collective representation of the classical capillarity relations can also be expressed by individual variables corresponding to the individual contributions of the interacting phases, based on the dimensional analysis and the law of similarity. The collective and the individual representation describe the same state of the system, but with variables of different meaning and number. The state of the surface layers in a heterogeneous system is, by definition, not independent of their own properties. The equations used only state that these values can also be expressed by the individual fundamental quantities of the bulk phases. However, it is possible only if the structure is physically similar and if the physico-chemical properties of adjoining phases affect only the geometrical size of the layer. The advantage of the individual representation is that all the quantities, unlike the collective ones, can be directly derived from measured data, at least in one way. If a phase of given properties participates in several equilibrium states, its parameter is perforce identical, and its value can therefore be determined by studying any of the corresponding systems. The surface tension γφψ of the layer sφψ can be defined according to the extremum behaviour of the elastic potential (Eq. 3). The effective thickness of the whole layer, τφψeff is the sum of the half layer thicknesses. According to the Wallot-formula (Eq.6), the derived physical quantity, X, which is always positive, can be expressed as a power law function of the fundamental quantities of the independent partial interactions, x i. The tension parameters determining the surface tension in an equilibrium ternary liquid system can be derived from the data of the three liquids by Eq. 8. The tension parameters of a solid phase can be calculated from Young's equation (Eq. 9). Table 1 contains parameters calculated according to Eqs 8-9. The parameters can be determined at least in one way. Thus, the data of a phase in any state of matter is theoretically available. Owing to the availability of the parameters, the algebraic uncertainty experienced in the individual representation (e.g. in Young's equation) can be eliminated. Thus, when this approach is applied, the surface tension of the solid surface can be determined easily. The individual representation can be applied in crystallography as well (Table 2).",
author = "Istv{\'a}n P{\'a}szli and K. L{\'a}szl{\'o}",
year = "2004",
month = "6",
language = "Hungarian",
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pages = "76--80",
journal = "Magyar Kemiai Folyoirat, Kemiai Kozlemenyek",
issn = "1418-9933",
publisher = "Magyar Kemikusok Egyesulete/Hungarian Chemical Society",
number = "2",

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N2 - The collective representation of the classical capillarity relations can also be expressed by individual variables corresponding to the individual contributions of the interacting phases, based on the dimensional analysis and the law of similarity. The collective and the individual representation describe the same state of the system, but with variables of different meaning and number. The state of the surface layers in a heterogeneous system is, by definition, not independent of their own properties. The equations used only state that these values can also be expressed by the individual fundamental quantities of the bulk phases. However, it is possible only if the structure is physically similar and if the physico-chemical properties of adjoining phases affect only the geometrical size of the layer. The advantage of the individual representation is that all the quantities, unlike the collective ones, can be directly derived from measured data, at least in one way. If a phase of given properties participates in several equilibrium states, its parameter is perforce identical, and its value can therefore be determined by studying any of the corresponding systems. The surface tension γφψ of the layer sφψ can be defined according to the extremum behaviour of the elastic potential (Eq. 3). The effective thickness of the whole layer, τφψeff is the sum of the half layer thicknesses. According to the Wallot-formula (Eq.6), the derived physical quantity, X, which is always positive, can be expressed as a power law function of the fundamental quantities of the independent partial interactions, x i. The tension parameters determining the surface tension in an equilibrium ternary liquid system can be derived from the data of the three liquids by Eq. 8. The tension parameters of a solid phase can be calculated from Young's equation (Eq. 9). Table 1 contains parameters calculated according to Eqs 8-9. The parameters can be determined at least in one way. Thus, the data of a phase in any state of matter is theoretically available. Owing to the availability of the parameters, the algebraic uncertainty experienced in the individual representation (e.g. in Young's equation) can be eliminated. Thus, when this approach is applied, the surface tension of the solid surface can be determined easily. The individual representation can be applied in crystallography as well (Table 2).

AB - The collective representation of the classical capillarity relations can also be expressed by individual variables corresponding to the individual contributions of the interacting phases, based on the dimensional analysis and the law of similarity. The collective and the individual representation describe the same state of the system, but with variables of different meaning and number. The state of the surface layers in a heterogeneous system is, by definition, not independent of their own properties. The equations used only state that these values can also be expressed by the individual fundamental quantities of the bulk phases. However, it is possible only if the structure is physically similar and if the physico-chemical properties of adjoining phases affect only the geometrical size of the layer. The advantage of the individual representation is that all the quantities, unlike the collective ones, can be directly derived from measured data, at least in one way. If a phase of given properties participates in several equilibrium states, its parameter is perforce identical, and its value can therefore be determined by studying any of the corresponding systems. The surface tension γφψ of the layer sφψ can be defined according to the extremum behaviour of the elastic potential (Eq. 3). The effective thickness of the whole layer, τφψeff is the sum of the half layer thicknesses. According to the Wallot-formula (Eq.6), the derived physical quantity, X, which is always positive, can be expressed as a power law function of the fundamental quantities of the independent partial interactions, x i. The tension parameters determining the surface tension in an equilibrium ternary liquid system can be derived from the data of the three liquids by Eq. 8. The tension parameters of a solid phase can be calculated from Young's equation (Eq. 9). Table 1 contains parameters calculated according to Eqs 8-9. The parameters can be determined at least in one way. Thus, the data of a phase in any state of matter is theoretically available. Owing to the availability of the parameters, the algebraic uncertainty experienced in the individual representation (e.g. in Young's equation) can be eliminated. Thus, when this approach is applied, the surface tension of the solid surface can be determined easily. The individual representation can be applied in crystallography as well (Table 2).

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