Increased circulating interleukin-17 levels in preeclampsia

A. Molvarec, Ibolya Czegle, János Szijártó, J. Rigó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests that an exaggerated maternal systemic inflammatory response and an angiogenic imbalance might play a central role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. We determined circulating levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17) along with those of angiogenic factors in healthy nonpregnant and pregnant women and preeclamptic patients, and examined whether serum IL-17 levels of preeclamptic patients were related to their clinical features and angiogenic factor concentrations. Fifty-nine preeclamptic patients, 60 healthy pregnant women and 56 healthy nonpregnant women were involved in this case-control study. Serum levels of IL-17A were measured using a high-sensitivity ELISA. Serum total soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and biologically active placental growth factor (PlGF) levels were determined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. For statistical analyses, nonparametric methods were applied. Serum IL-17 levels were significantly higher in preeclamptic patients than in healthy nonpregnant and pregnant women. We did not find any relationship between serum IL-17 concentrations of preeclamptic patients and their clinical features and serum sFlt-1 and PlGF levels or sFlt-1/PlGF ratios. However, elevated serum IL-17 level and sFlt-1/PlGF ratio were found to have an additive effect on the risk of preeclampsia, as shown by the substantially higher odds ratios of a combination of the two than of either alone. In conclusion, serum IL-17 levels are increased in preeclampsia, which may contribute to the development of the excessive systemic inflammatory response characteristic of the maternal syndrome of the disease. In addition, elevated serum IL-17 level and sFlt-1/PlGF ratio had an additive (joint) effect on the risk of preeclampsia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-57
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Reproductive Immunology
Volume112
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

Interleukin-17
Pre-Eclampsia
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1
Serum
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Pregnant Women
Angiogenesis Inducing Agents
Mothers
Immunoassay
Case-Control Studies
Joints
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Inflammation
  • Interleukin-17
  • Preeclampsia
  • Pregnancy
  • Th17

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

Increased circulating interleukin-17 levels in preeclampsia. / Molvarec, A.; Czegle, Ibolya; Szijártó, János; Rigó, J.

In: Journal of Reproductive Immunology, Vol. 112, 01.11.2015, p. 53-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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