In vivo and in situ visualization of early physiological events induced by heavy metals in pea root meristem

Nóra Lehotai, Andrea Peto, Szilvia Bajkán, L. Erdei, I. Tari, Zsuzsanna Kolbert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Heavy metals (HMs) are toxic pollutants, which can negatively affect the physiological processes of plants; moreover, HMs can be present in the food chain endangering people's health. The aim of this study was to investigate the early physiological events during HM exposure in the root tips of the food plant Pisum sativum L. Ten-day-old pea plants were treated with 100 μM CdCl2 or CuSO4, in nutrient solution for 48 h. We studied the rapid formation of different reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide H2O2 and superoxide radical O2·-) and reactive nitrogen species (nitric oxide NO· and peroxynitrite ONOO-) together with membrane damage and cell death in the meristem cells of pea roots using in vivo and in situ microscopic methods. In our experimental system, copper and cadmium induced the formation of H2O2 and NO. Two hours of heavy metal treatments resulted in an increased O2·- formation; however, later the level of this reactive molecule dramatically decreased. We found that high levels of NO were needed for ONOO- production under HM exposure. A fast loss of membrane integrity and decreased cell viability were detected in root tips of copper-treated plants. The effects of cadmium seemed to be slower compared to copper, but this non-essential metal also caused cell death. We concluded that viability decreased when NO and H2O2 levels were simultaneously high in the same tissues. Using the NO scavenger it was also evidenced that NO generation is essential for cell death induction under copper or cadmium stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2199-2207
Number of pages9
JournalActa Physiologiae Plantarum
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Meristem
root meristems
Peas
Heavy Metals
peas
heavy metals
Copper
copper
Cadmium
cell death
cadmium
Cell Death
root tips
Plant Physiological Phenomena
Reactive Nitrogen Species
Cadmium Chloride
Edible Plants
Peroxynitrous Acid
Food Chain
Membranes

Keywords

  • Cell death
  • Heavy metal stress
  • Pisum sativum L. root
  • Reactive nitrogen species
  • Reactive oxygen species

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

In vivo and in situ visualization of early physiological events induced by heavy metals in pea root meristem. / Lehotai, Nóra; Peto, Andrea; Bajkán, Szilvia; Erdei, L.; Tari, I.; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna.

In: Acta Physiologiae Plantarum, Vol. 33, No. 6, 01.01.2011, p. 2199-2207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lehotai, Nóra ; Peto, Andrea ; Bajkán, Szilvia ; Erdei, L. ; Tari, I. ; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna. / In vivo and in situ visualization of early physiological events induced by heavy metals in pea root meristem. In: Acta Physiologiae Plantarum. 2011 ; Vol. 33, No. 6. pp. 2199-2207.
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