In situ observations of magnetic field fluctuations

G. Erdős, André Balogh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is well known that the irregularities of the magnetic field are intimately related to the motion of charged particles. Although transport theories need the spatial and time variations of the magnetic field as input, in situ observations are very limited. Ulysses observations have provided a major step forward by entering the unexplored high latitude regions of the heliosphere, the knowledge of which is vital to interpret particle flux measurements, even at the ecliptic. We analyze the magnetic field data of Ulysses during the mission to study the waves and discontinuities in the heliosphere at different locations, covering a total sunspot cycle. Various tools are employed, including power spectral and structure function analysis. A remarkable difference was found between the fluctuations in the fast and slow solar wind. We argue that the latitudinal extent of the high speed solar wind contributes significantly to the latitudinal variation of the transport parameters, which should also affect the 11 (and 22) year modulation cycle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)625-635
Number of pages11
JournalAdvances in Space Research
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Solar wind
heliosphere
Magnetic fields
magnetic field
solar wind
magnetic fields
sunspot cycle
ecliptic
transport theory
flux measurement
Charged particles
flux (rate)
irregularities
sunspot
polar regions
discontinuity
charged particles
coverings
high speed
Modulation

Keywords

  • Heliosphere
  • MHD waves
  • Turbulence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

In situ observations of magnetic field fluctuations. / Erdős, G.; Balogh, André.

In: Advances in Space Research, Vol. 35, No. 4, 2005, p. 625-635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Erdős, G. ; Balogh, André. / In situ observations of magnetic field fluctuations. In: Advances in Space Research. 2005 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 625-635.
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