In-situ formation of light-absorbing organic matter in cloud water

A. Gelencsér, A. Hoffer, G. Kiss, E. Tombácz, R. Kurdi, L. Bencze

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

145 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current climate models seem to underestimate the flux of solar energy absorbed by the global troposphere. All of these models are constrained with the assumption that cloud droplets consist of pure water. Here we demonstrate in a simple laboratory experiment that aromatic hydroxyacids which are found in continental fine aerosol can react with hydroxyl radicals under typical conditions prevalent in cloud water influenced by biomass burning. The reactions yield colored organic species which do absorb solar radiation. We also suggest that the products of such reactions may be humic-like substances whose presence in continental aerosol has been confirmed but their source mechanisms are still much sought after. We also attempt to give a first order estimate of the enhancement of water absorption at a visible wavelength under atmospheric conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-33
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Atmospheric Chemistry
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2003

Fingerprint

cloud water
Aerosols
Biological materials
aerosol
Climate models
organic matter
Troposphere
Water
cloud droplet
Water absorption
hydroxyl radical
biomass burning
Solar radiation
Hydroxyl Radical
Solar energy
solar radiation
troposphere
climate modeling
Biomass
Fluxes

Keywords

  • Aromatic acids
  • Cloud water
  • Complex refractive index of water
  • Humic-like substances
  • Light absorption
  • OH radical
  • Polymerization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

In-situ formation of light-absorbing organic matter in cloud water. / Gelencsér, A.; Hoffer, A.; Kiss, G.; Tombácz, E.; Kurdi, R.; Bencze, L.

In: Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, Vol. 45, No. 1, 05.2003, p. 25-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c803502804814591b953bf588afa8257,
title = "In-situ formation of light-absorbing organic matter in cloud water",
abstract = "Current climate models seem to underestimate the flux of solar energy absorbed by the global troposphere. All of these models are constrained with the assumption that cloud droplets consist of pure water. Here we demonstrate in a simple laboratory experiment that aromatic hydroxyacids which are found in continental fine aerosol can react with hydroxyl radicals under typical conditions prevalent in cloud water influenced by biomass burning. The reactions yield colored organic species which do absorb solar radiation. We also suggest that the products of such reactions may be humic-like substances whose presence in continental aerosol has been confirmed but their source mechanisms are still much sought after. We also attempt to give a first order estimate of the enhancement of water absorption at a visible wavelength under atmospheric conditions.",
keywords = "Aromatic acids, Cloud water, Complex refractive index of water, Humic-like substances, Light absorption, OH radical, Polymerization",
author = "A. Gelencs{\'e}r and A. Hoffer and G. Kiss and E. Tomb{\'a}cz and R. Kurdi and L. Bencze",
year = "2003",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1023/A:1024060428172",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "25--33",
journal = "Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry",
issn = "0167-7764",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In-situ formation of light-absorbing organic matter in cloud water

AU - Gelencsér, A.

AU - Hoffer, A.

AU - Kiss, G.

AU - Tombácz, E.

AU - Kurdi, R.

AU - Bencze, L.

PY - 2003/5

Y1 - 2003/5

N2 - Current climate models seem to underestimate the flux of solar energy absorbed by the global troposphere. All of these models are constrained with the assumption that cloud droplets consist of pure water. Here we demonstrate in a simple laboratory experiment that aromatic hydroxyacids which are found in continental fine aerosol can react with hydroxyl radicals under typical conditions prevalent in cloud water influenced by biomass burning. The reactions yield colored organic species which do absorb solar radiation. We also suggest that the products of such reactions may be humic-like substances whose presence in continental aerosol has been confirmed but their source mechanisms are still much sought after. We also attempt to give a first order estimate of the enhancement of water absorption at a visible wavelength under atmospheric conditions.

AB - Current climate models seem to underestimate the flux of solar energy absorbed by the global troposphere. All of these models are constrained with the assumption that cloud droplets consist of pure water. Here we demonstrate in a simple laboratory experiment that aromatic hydroxyacids which are found in continental fine aerosol can react with hydroxyl radicals under typical conditions prevalent in cloud water influenced by biomass burning. The reactions yield colored organic species which do absorb solar radiation. We also suggest that the products of such reactions may be humic-like substances whose presence in continental aerosol has been confirmed but their source mechanisms are still much sought after. We also attempt to give a first order estimate of the enhancement of water absorption at a visible wavelength under atmospheric conditions.

KW - Aromatic acids

KW - Cloud water

KW - Complex refractive index of water

KW - Humic-like substances

KW - Light absorption

KW - OH radical

KW - Polymerization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0038236738&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0038236738&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1023/A:1024060428172

DO - 10.1023/A:1024060428172

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0038236738

VL - 45

SP - 25

EP - 33

JO - Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry

JF - Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry

SN - 0167-7764

IS - 1

ER -