Importance of various habitats in agricultural landscape related to integrated pest management: A preliminary study

J. Kiss, F. Kádár, E. Kozma, I. Tóth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The general aim of ensuring a nearly natural environment and ecological plant protection needs deeper knowledge in the field of functional interactions between different habitats, which serve as general species reserves and, from an ecological plant protection point of view, as resources of beneficial arthropods as well as pests. In Hungary, specific conditions (large-scale farming and the presence of field margins) have provided the opportunity to study the importance of both fields and field margins as insect habitats through time and space. Large fields brought about a reduction of the effect on immigration or crossing of insects of field margins and neighbouring plant stands. Surveys have been conducted in a winter wheat field and in the weedy field margins. Pests, beneficial arthropods and other nontarget organisms were collected by using pitfall traps, by sweeping and by individual plant examination. Species of carabids, individual numbers of staphylinids, spiders, cantharids, coccinellids (predators), aphids and Oulema spp. (the most common winter wheat pests in Hungary) in the field margin and in the field are compared. Similarity and diversity values of carabids, and the distribution of cantharid adults and larvae are given, focusing on the different functions of the field margin and the field as habitats. Conclusions are given on the importance of these habitats for species preservation as well as for ecological pest management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-198
Number of pages8
JournalLandscape and Urban Planning
Volume27
Issue number2-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Fingerprint

field margin
integrated pest management
edge effects
agricultural land
habitat
habitats
beneficial arthropods
plant protection
Hungary
arthropod
winter wheat
Oulema
wheat
pests
insect
arthropod pests
nontarget organism
insects
pitfall trap
nontarget organisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Importance of various habitats in agricultural landscape related to integrated pest management : A preliminary study. / Kiss, J.; Kádár, F.; Kozma, E.; Tóth, I.

In: Landscape and Urban Planning, Vol. 27, No. 2-4, 1993, p. 191-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{10f20cd5cff4440fa401c7f5c6312d81,
title = "Importance of various habitats in agricultural landscape related to integrated pest management: A preliminary study",
abstract = "The general aim of ensuring a nearly natural environment and ecological plant protection needs deeper knowledge in the field of functional interactions between different habitats, which serve as general species reserves and, from an ecological plant protection point of view, as resources of beneficial arthropods as well as pests. In Hungary, specific conditions (large-scale farming and the presence of field margins) have provided the opportunity to study the importance of both fields and field margins as insect habitats through time and space. Large fields brought about a reduction of the effect on immigration or crossing of insects of field margins and neighbouring plant stands. Surveys have been conducted in a winter wheat field and in the weedy field margins. Pests, beneficial arthropods and other nontarget organisms were collected by using pitfall traps, by sweeping and by individual plant examination. Species of carabids, individual numbers of staphylinids, spiders, cantharids, coccinellids (predators), aphids and Oulema spp. (the most common winter wheat pests in Hungary) in the field margin and in the field are compared. Similarity and diversity values of carabids, and the distribution of cantharid adults and larvae are given, focusing on the different functions of the field margin and the field as habitats. Conclusions are given on the importance of these habitats for species preservation as well as for ecological pest management.",
author = "J. Kiss and F. K{\'a}d{\'a}r and E. Kozma and I. T{\'o}th",
year = "1993",
doi = "10.1016/0169-2046(93)90049-J",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "191--198",
journal = "Landscape and Urban Planning",
issn = "0169-2046",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Importance of various habitats in agricultural landscape related to integrated pest management

T2 - A preliminary study

AU - Kiss, J.

AU - Kádár, F.

AU - Kozma, E.

AU - Tóth, I.

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - The general aim of ensuring a nearly natural environment and ecological plant protection needs deeper knowledge in the field of functional interactions between different habitats, which serve as general species reserves and, from an ecological plant protection point of view, as resources of beneficial arthropods as well as pests. In Hungary, specific conditions (large-scale farming and the presence of field margins) have provided the opportunity to study the importance of both fields and field margins as insect habitats through time and space. Large fields brought about a reduction of the effect on immigration or crossing of insects of field margins and neighbouring plant stands. Surveys have been conducted in a winter wheat field and in the weedy field margins. Pests, beneficial arthropods and other nontarget organisms were collected by using pitfall traps, by sweeping and by individual plant examination. Species of carabids, individual numbers of staphylinids, spiders, cantharids, coccinellids (predators), aphids and Oulema spp. (the most common winter wheat pests in Hungary) in the field margin and in the field are compared. Similarity and diversity values of carabids, and the distribution of cantharid adults and larvae are given, focusing on the different functions of the field margin and the field as habitats. Conclusions are given on the importance of these habitats for species preservation as well as for ecological pest management.

AB - The general aim of ensuring a nearly natural environment and ecological plant protection needs deeper knowledge in the field of functional interactions between different habitats, which serve as general species reserves and, from an ecological plant protection point of view, as resources of beneficial arthropods as well as pests. In Hungary, specific conditions (large-scale farming and the presence of field margins) have provided the opportunity to study the importance of both fields and field margins as insect habitats through time and space. Large fields brought about a reduction of the effect on immigration or crossing of insects of field margins and neighbouring plant stands. Surveys have been conducted in a winter wheat field and in the weedy field margins. Pests, beneficial arthropods and other nontarget organisms were collected by using pitfall traps, by sweeping and by individual plant examination. Species of carabids, individual numbers of staphylinids, spiders, cantharids, coccinellids (predators), aphids and Oulema spp. (the most common winter wheat pests in Hungary) in the field margin and in the field are compared. Similarity and diversity values of carabids, and the distribution of cantharid adults and larvae are given, focusing on the different functions of the field margin and the field as habitats. Conclusions are given on the importance of these habitats for species preservation as well as for ecological pest management.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=38249000702&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=38249000702&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0169-2046(93)90049-J

DO - 10.1016/0169-2046(93)90049-J

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:38249000702

VL - 27

SP - 191

EP - 198

JO - Landscape and Urban Planning

JF - Landscape and Urban Planning

SN - 0169-2046

IS - 2-4

ER -