Importance of reverse signaling of the TNF superfamily in immune regulation

Kata Juhász, Krisztina Buzás, E. Duda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

TNF-related ligands (with the exception of lymphotoxin-α) are synthesized as type II transmembrane proteins, though many of them also have soluble forms. An increasing number of publications report that these 'ligands' behave as receptors, activating intracellular signaling pathways when interacting with cognate 'receptors' or agonistic antibodies. Most members of the TNF family and their receptors influence survival, proliferation, differentiation or activation of immune cells. The elicited 'reverse signals' also have significant importance. They proved to be involved in the activation of APCs, T and B cells, differentiation of osteoclasts and apoptosis of activated macrophages. They influence the balance between destructive immune response and tolerance. Several examples show that therapeutic manipulation of the reverse signal can help to treat malignancies as well as autoimmune disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-348
Number of pages14
JournalExpert Review of Clinical Immunology
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Ligands
Lymphotoxin-alpha
Immune Tolerance
Osteoclasts
Publications
Cell Differentiation
B-Lymphocytes
Macrophages
Apoptosis
T-Lymphocytes
Antibodies
Neoplasms
Proteins
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • agonistic antibody
  • bidirectional signaling
  • immune regulation
  • reverse signaling
  • soluble receptor
  • TNF family
  • TNF receptor family

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Importance of reverse signaling of the TNF superfamily in immune regulation. / Juhász, Kata; Buzás, Krisztina; Duda, E.

In: Expert Review of Clinical Immunology, Vol. 9, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 335-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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