Impaired reproduction of histamine deficient (histidine-decarboxylase knockout) mice is caused predominantly by a decreased male mating behavior

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Problem: Histamine induces a Th2 shift. As successful allopregnancy is characterized by a peripheral Th2 dominance, we investigated the role of histamine in reproduction. Methods of study: HDC knockout (HOC-/-) or wild-type (HDC+/+) mice kept on histamine-deficient or normal diet were mated. Appearance of vaginal plugs indicated day 0.5 of pregnancy. On day 10.5 uteri were inspected. Splenic IFN-γ production and cytotoxic activity were determined. Results: In HDC+/+ or HDC-/- females on normal diet, plugs appeared between 3 and 6 days. In 80% of the (HDC-/-)/(HDC-/-) matings on histamine-deficient diet, no vaginal plugs were observed for more than 1 month. After replacing males with the wild type, plugs appeared within 3 days. In HDC-/- mice, litter size was lower than in HDC+/+ animals. Cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production were significantly increased in non-pregnant histamine-deficient mice, but not in pregnant mice. Conclusion: Histamine affects male mating behavior, but is not indispensable for successful pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)152-158
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Reproductive Immunology
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2 2003

Keywords

  • Cytokines
  • Cytotoxicity
  • Histamine deficiency
  • Reproduction
  • T-cell polarization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Impaired reproduction of histamine deficient (histidine-decarboxylase knockout) mice is caused predominantly by a decreased male mating behavior'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this