Idos, belgyógyászati fekvobetegek komorbid pszichiátriai állapotainak hatása a kórházi kezelés idotartamára és a kezeléssel kapcsolatos költségekre.

Translated title of the contribution: Impact of comorbid psychiatric disorders on the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment among geriatric patients treated on internal medicine wards

Gábor Sebestyén, Mátyás Hamar, László Bíró, Gábor Kovács, G. Gazdag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Coexistence of psychiatric comorbidity is very common in patients hospitalized with somatic problems. Several studies have shown that comorbid dementia increases the length of stay (LOS) in hospitals. The literature is more contradictory in the case of anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, mood disorders and delirium. AIMS: Our aim was to explore the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the average length of hospital stay and the related costs among geriatric patients treated in internal wards. METHODS: The examination was conducted on two departments of internal medicine for 3 months on all admitted patients above 65 years. Four psychometric tests were carried out in the first three days after hospitalization as a screen for psychiatric comorbidity. RESULTS: In the whole study group the incidence of a depression syndrome of various severity reached 56%. We have not identified any difference in LOS when the depressive and non-depressive groups were compared. 59% of the patients showed some degree of cognitive impairment. Mean LOS was 7.4 days longer among patient suffering in severe dementia than in the group showing no cognitive deficit. CONCLUSION: Our results have demonstrated that of the investigated psychiatric comorbid conditions, an increased LOS is connected only with dementia. The degree of the cognitive impairment shows a positive correlation with the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment. Given the high incidence rate of affective syndromes, it can be assumed that comorbid depression increases the chance of admission to an internal medicine ward with some somatic complaints. This can be attributed to a larval stage of depression manifesting as somatic symptoms.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)386-392
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatria Hungarica : A Magyar Pszichiátriai Társaság tudományos folyóirata
Volume21
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Internal Medicine
Geriatrics
Health Care Costs
Psychiatry
Length of Stay
Dementia
Comorbidity
Depression
Delirium
Anxiety Disorders
Mood Disorders
Psychometrics
Substance-Related Disorders
Hospitalization
Cohort Studies
Costs and Cost Analysis
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{af129d34a6e44c918ad6b55c7b195596,
title = "Idos, belgy{\'o}gy{\'a}szati fekvobetegek komorbid pszichi{\'a}triai {\'a}llapotainak hat{\'a}sa a k{\'o}rh{\'a}zi kezel{\'e}s idotartam{\'a}ra {\'e}s a kezel{\'e}ssel kapcsolatos k{\"o}lts{\'e}gekre.",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Coexistence of psychiatric comorbidity is very common in patients hospitalized with somatic problems. Several studies have shown that comorbid dementia increases the length of stay (LOS) in hospitals. The literature is more contradictory in the case of anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, mood disorders and delirium. AIMS: Our aim was to explore the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the average length of hospital stay and the related costs among geriatric patients treated in internal wards. METHODS: The examination was conducted on two departments of internal medicine for 3 months on all admitted patients above 65 years. Four psychometric tests were carried out in the first three days after hospitalization as a screen for psychiatric comorbidity. RESULTS: In the whole study group the incidence of a depression syndrome of various severity reached 56{\%}. We have not identified any difference in LOS when the depressive and non-depressive groups were compared. 59{\%} of the patients showed some degree of cognitive impairment. Mean LOS was 7.4 days longer among patient suffering in severe dementia than in the group showing no cognitive deficit. CONCLUSION: Our results have demonstrated that of the investigated psychiatric comorbid conditions, an increased LOS is connected only with dementia. The degree of the cognitive impairment shows a positive correlation with the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment. Given the high incidence rate of affective syndromes, it can be assumed that comorbid depression increases the chance of admission to an internal medicine ward with some somatic complaints. This can be attributed to a larval stage of depression manifesting as somatic symptoms.",
author = "G{\'a}bor Sebesty{\'e}n and M{\'a}ty{\'a}s Hamar and L{\'a}szl{\'o} B{\'i}r{\'o} and G{\'a}bor Kov{\'a}cs and G. Gazdag",
year = "2006",
language = "Hungarian",
volume = "21",
pages = "386--392",
journal = "Psychiatria Hungarica",
issn = "0237-7896",
publisher = "Magyar Pszichiatriai Tarsasag Tudomanyos Folyoirata",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Idos, belgyógyászati fekvobetegek komorbid pszichiátriai állapotainak hatása a kórházi kezelés idotartamára és a kezeléssel kapcsolatos költségekre.

AU - Sebestyén, Gábor

AU - Hamar, Mátyás

AU - Bíró, László

AU - Kovács, Gábor

AU - Gazdag, G.

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Coexistence of psychiatric comorbidity is very common in patients hospitalized with somatic problems. Several studies have shown that comorbid dementia increases the length of stay (LOS) in hospitals. The literature is more contradictory in the case of anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, mood disorders and delirium. AIMS: Our aim was to explore the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the average length of hospital stay and the related costs among geriatric patients treated in internal wards. METHODS: The examination was conducted on two departments of internal medicine for 3 months on all admitted patients above 65 years. Four psychometric tests were carried out in the first three days after hospitalization as a screen for psychiatric comorbidity. RESULTS: In the whole study group the incidence of a depression syndrome of various severity reached 56%. We have not identified any difference in LOS when the depressive and non-depressive groups were compared. 59% of the patients showed some degree of cognitive impairment. Mean LOS was 7.4 days longer among patient suffering in severe dementia than in the group showing no cognitive deficit. CONCLUSION: Our results have demonstrated that of the investigated psychiatric comorbid conditions, an increased LOS is connected only with dementia. The degree of the cognitive impairment shows a positive correlation with the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment. Given the high incidence rate of affective syndromes, it can be assumed that comorbid depression increases the chance of admission to an internal medicine ward with some somatic complaints. This can be attributed to a larval stage of depression manifesting as somatic symptoms.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Coexistence of psychiatric comorbidity is very common in patients hospitalized with somatic problems. Several studies have shown that comorbid dementia increases the length of stay (LOS) in hospitals. The literature is more contradictory in the case of anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, mood disorders and delirium. AIMS: Our aim was to explore the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the average length of hospital stay and the related costs among geriatric patients treated in internal wards. METHODS: The examination was conducted on two departments of internal medicine for 3 months on all admitted patients above 65 years. Four psychometric tests were carried out in the first three days after hospitalization as a screen for psychiatric comorbidity. RESULTS: In the whole study group the incidence of a depression syndrome of various severity reached 56%. We have not identified any difference in LOS when the depressive and non-depressive groups were compared. 59% of the patients showed some degree of cognitive impairment. Mean LOS was 7.4 days longer among patient suffering in severe dementia than in the group showing no cognitive deficit. CONCLUSION: Our results have demonstrated that of the investigated psychiatric comorbid conditions, an increased LOS is connected only with dementia. The degree of the cognitive impairment shows a positive correlation with the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment. Given the high incidence rate of affective syndromes, it can be assumed that comorbid depression increases the chance of admission to an internal medicine ward with some somatic complaints. This can be attributed to a larval stage of depression manifesting as somatic symptoms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34248562615&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34248562615&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 17297201

AN - SCOPUS:34248562615

VL - 21

SP - 386

EP - 392

JO - Psychiatria Hungarica

JF - Psychiatria Hungarica

SN - 0237-7896

IS - 5

ER -