Identifying cause of declining flows in the Republican River

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Republican River, shared by three states, Colorado, Nebraska, and Kansas, has yielded depleted streamflow at the Nebraska-Kansas border forder for about 20 years when compared to values preceding 1970. Based on model results estimating the average annual water balance of the basin, it is concluded that the observed decline in runoff cannot be explained by changes in climatic variables over the area; rather, it is the results of the combined effects of the following human activities: crop irrigation, change in vegetative cover, water conservation practices, and construction of reservoirs and artificial ponds in the basin. These human-induced changes have one property in common: they all increase the amount of water being evaporated over the basin, thereby reducing the amount of water available to runoff.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)244-253
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Water Resources Planning and Management
Volume127
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2001

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Rivers
river
Runoff
water
cause
basin
runoff
Water
Water conservation
Ponds
Irrigation
Catchments
Crops
streamflow
water budget
human activity
pond
irrigation
crop
conservation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

Identifying cause of declining flows in the Republican River. / Szilagyi, J.

In: Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol. 127, No. 4, 07.2001, p. 244-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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